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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
http://gunnuts.net/2011/02/03/what-makes-good-practice/

Excellent article by Shelley.

In this article she discusses what most novice shooters miss and that's that practice doesn't always help you improve your skills. For example, say I wanted to take up knitting. Just grabbing a needle and some yarn and going at it wouldn't do me much good. I could probably throw a stitch but it wouldn't be good and I likely wouldn't ever improve enough to make anything I would be happy with without proper instruction and at least some supervision initially. The key to learning, in my mind, is proper instruction and feedback followed by practice, practice, practice. Practice before you learn the proper technique only reinforces bad habits, some of which are much harder to fix than to learn correctly from the beginning.

Grabbing a gun, some ammo, and paper targets and hitting the range on your own is much the same as my knitting example. You might get used to the recoil and figure out how you need to hold your sights to get on "target" but your overall shooting won't improve by leaps and bounds. It ABSOLUTELY won't make you a better gun fighter. (Note the difference between being a good "shooter" and a good "gun fighter". That's another post for another day.)

Note in the first paragraph I said "novice" shooters and not "new" shooters. The majority of folks that own firearms (and even shoot with some frequency) have had them for years and years but never really advance beyond "novice". I attribute this to lack of proper training.

Side Note: In the article Shelley directs folks to http://pistol-training.com/ . I will be attending a Todd Louis Green's 2-day Aim Fast, Hit Fast class in early March. I can't wait. A couple of other GLOCK.Pro members are also signed up.
 

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VolGrad once again put together some extremely important info IMO. Note: Pistol-Training.com You need that hyphen or you go to a totally different site (yes VolGrad I've seen you there, very useful tool for instructors).
 

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I'd searched out that thread already, you've definitely got the right idea. I do a lot of instruction and am always looking for new and fresh ideas. I put a post on pistol-training.com yesterday in ref to ToddG's "My Kung-fu is better than your Kung-fu". I always try and present as many different options as I can for new shooters. What works for me doesn't necessarily work you. Find what works and practice it. I also try and explain that there is a huge difference between target practice and gun-fighting training. Both are essential, but very, very different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
.... there is a huge difference between target practice and gun-fighting training. Both are essential, but very, very different.
Absolutely. One needs to get the fundamentals of marksmanship down first then move on to mindset and "other" skills such as weapons manipulation, movement, drawing the pistol, and many, many more things I don't care to list off.

It's great if someone knows how to shoot a firearm accurately. Wonderful.

... but can you use under stress? Are you even willing to use it? Have you prepared for the worst case scenario of what can happen ina gun fight? Do you realize how fast most gun fights take place and that you won't have time to "figure it out" as you go. You will react based on your training .... or lack thereof.
 

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“We don’t rise to the level of our expectations – we fall to the level of our training”
-Archilochus, Greek Soldier

It certainly gets everyone's attention when I ask an intermediate class, "Who here has ever been handcuffed? Because if you are involved in an armed confrontation, you will be, and probably spend the night in jail."
 

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Absolutely. One needs to get the fundamentals of marksmanship down first then move on to mindset and "other" skills such as weapons manipulation, movement, drawing the pistol, and many, many more things I don't care to list off.

It's great if someone knows how to shoot a firearm accurately. Wonderful.

... but can you use under stress?
Great question and one that people should definitely ask themselves. It's one of the reasons why I don't feel ready to carry yet. I've only taken a basic defensive handgun course (2 days, 800 rounds), but definitely need more time. Like Occam said, competition shooting is one thing. Tactical shooting is another kind of beast.

On a side note-- your posts and Shelley's at Gun Nuts are always helpful. If this is the Shelley I think I know, she works at one of the indoor ranges in Western Washington. This isn't too much of a stretch since Caleb at Gun Nuts Media has been pretty active here, teaching IDPA and promoting the sport. It's great to have them in the area.
 
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