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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd like to understand how the glock works and I have technical question about the full auto converted Glocks. Not the Glock 18C but those with the full auto sear at the back. I understand how the Glock 18C is working and able to control firing. But not how the auto sears do.

I was wondering why those full auto converted glocks stop firing if you release the trigger. Because the way the sear is designed, it pushes down the trigger bar just before the trigger bar would normally be able to catch the striker. But that would be always the case and the full auto glock would continue to fire until the mag is empty. But on those youtube videos, in which they show the full auto converted glocks, they are able to stop the glock from firing in between before the mag is empty by just releasing the trigger.

How is this possible?

My question is what exactly stops such a full auto converted glock from firing once it has fired the first shot in full auto mode, if the Auto sear is designed to push down the Trigger bar automatically?

Is it the striker striker safety block that stops the firing? But that can only engage, if the trigger bar is moved forward. And the trigger bar can only move forward, if the striker catches the bar and its force pushed the striker bar forward, which never happens, if the glock is in full auto mode.

I have a hard time understanding, how the trigger bar can be pushed forward again and the glock be stopped from firing, if the trigger bar is blocked from catching the striker spring when it is in full auto mode.

Anyone has the knowledge to explain this?

Thanks!
 

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The trigger moves forward so the wedge doesn’t make contact with the trigger bar to push it down.

Also, when the trigger moves forward the arm of the cruciform moves on top of the drop safety so even if it did make contact the bar would not move down to release the firing pin lug.

BTW - those things are a good way to go to jail.


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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The trigger moves forward so the wedge doesn't make contact with the trigger bar to push it down.
Thats what I don't understand.

The trigger can not move forward if the the trigger bar does not catch the striker. The wedge is there to make sure that the trigger bar is always pushed down right before it is about to catch the striker.

And if the striker does no catch the trigger bar, there is no striker spring force that will allow the trigger to go back. SO even if you loosen your trigger finger, the trigger will remain in the pulled position and the striker continuously striking until there is no ammo left.

The only way for the trigger to be reset is by the striker catching the trigger bar and that is explicitly avoided by the wedge.

I don't understand how with such a construction you can can stop firing midway before the ammo is empty.

And of course we are just talking out of academic interest in the construction and workings of a glock.
 

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And of course we are just talking out of academic interest in the construction and workings of a glock.
Of course !

 
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What's said it's it just as hard to get bullets and primers to reload.

Gaz
 

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Thats what I don't understand.

The trigger can not move forward if the the trigger bar does not catch the striker. The wedge is there to make sure that the trigger bar is always pushed down right before it is about to catch the striker.

And if the striker does no catch the trigger bar, there is no striker spring force that will allow the trigger to go back. SO even if you loosen your trigger finger, the trigger will remain in the pulled position and the striker continuously striking until there is no ammo left.

The only way for the trigger to be reset is by the striker catching the trigger bar and that is explicitly avoided by the wedge.

I don't understand how with such a construction you can can stop firing midway before the ammo is empty.

And of course we are just talking out of academic interest in the construction and workings of a glock.
The cycle of the gun is the same as a standard Glock.

First round - trigger is pulled to the rear, pushing the firing pin to the rear.

The connector causes the trigger bar to drop down releasing the firing pin.

The slide cycles to the rear - the wedge (different "wedge" that's on all Glocks) along the rail pushes the connector over allowing the trigger spring to pull the trigger back up to full height.

As the slide comes forward the firing pin makes contact with the trigger bar.

Because the trigger is held to the rear - the firing pin and trigger bar stay to the rear as the slide continues to move forward into battery.

As the slide returns to full battery, both the trigger and firing pin are fully to the rear. The full auto wedge now makes contact with the arm of the trigger bar and pushes the trigger bar down releasing the firing pin, to cause the next round to fire.

IF you release the trigger - as the slide comes forward and the firing pin makes contact with the trigger bar. But instead of both remaining to the rear, they move forward with the slide. The trigger moves all the way forward (trigger safety engages) and the wedge was not able to make contact to cause the gun to fire.

The key to understanding is to realize nothing related to the normal cycle of a Glock has changed. Only the wedge was added to cause the trigger bar to release the firing pin when the trigger is being held to the rear. Once the trigger is release the cycle causes the trigger and firing pin to move forward as it normally would and the wedge doesn't make contact.

Re-reading your post, I think what you are missing is that the wedge is part of the slide. As the slide cycles to the rear, the wedge is not in contact with any part of the trigger bar. It only makes contact as the slide comes forward again. If the firing pin pushes the trigger bar forward as the slide moves forward the wedge can't make contact.

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
The cycle of the gun is the same as a standard Glock.

As the slide cycles to the rear, the wedge is not in contact with any part of the trigger bar. It only makes contact as the slide comes forward again. If the firing pin pushes the trigger bar forward as the slide moves forward the wedge can't make contact.

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OK thanks for the write up that makes it clear now.

There is a range at which the striker and the trigger bar interact in which the striker catches and pushes the trigger bar forward. The full Auto Wedge only comes into play, if the Trigger is fully held back, and the slide is in the full forward position. Only then the wedge automatically pushes trigger bar downward and releases the striker to strike the next bullet.

If the trigger is released, the striker and the trigger bar interact at a range shortly before the slide is in the full forward position, so that the striker is able to catch and push the trigger bar forward so that the full auto wedge can not interact and cause the trigger bar to push down.

Critical to understand this is that there is short range in which the striker and trigger bar interact with each other. The wedge can manipulate them only while the trigger is held and the slide is in full forward position, not at any other stage of the cycling.

The important thing to understand here is that the glock is always partly cocked and the striker is always pushing the trigger bar forward. Their interaction lasts from Zero to the striker break and the auto sear wedge only interferes in a very short stage of that interaction.

Now I understand!

Thanks!
 
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