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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
any techniques you guys/ladies use while shooting at the range ?? For example , how many yards you start from or any scenarios you like using at the range while shooting at the target ect ......... ?
 

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My distances vary from a couple of feet to 600 meters :) depending on what I am working on that day. With pistols as I am assuming that is what you referring to I like to work the Glock M, plates, and the El Presidenta. I will try anything and spend a lot of time standing on one point shooting at a boring silhouette also though because others are at the range.

When my daughter is with me we take a RC car and stop for helium filled balloons on the way. I tie a balloon to the car and she drives it back and forth on the range. Stopping, starting the balloon going up and down forwards, and backwards. She has no rule except to keep the car on the range. Makes for a very difficult target especially after you buy a couple of cars (replacements)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
my distances vary from a couple of feet to 600 meters :) depending on what i am working on that day. With pistols as i am assuming that is what you referring to i like to work the glock m, plates, and the el presidenta. I will try anything and spend a lot of time standing on one point shooting at a boring silhouette also though because others are at the range.

When my daughter is with me we take a rc car and stop for helium filled balloons on the way. I tie a balloon to the car and she drives it back and forth on the range. Stopping, starting the balloon going up and down forwards, and backwards. She has no rule except to keep the car on the range. Makes for a very difficult target especially after you buy a couple of cars (replacements)
now that is real kool !
 

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I try :cool:
 

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You can find cheap cars that work ok for $35-$50. Buy a couple extra batteries for it and have fun
 

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I usually do a modified IDPA at the range, two 6 inch shoot n see targets at 21 feet/7 yards, unholster and fire six shots, move to the side for cover, reload, move back and 6 more shots on the other target. Try to do it as fast as you can while keeping all shots in. This will train you for unholstering, reloading, and quick target aquisition. I usually can do it in about 4 secs, but at the beginning it was though to get all shots in the targets. I think this is about as good you can do when confined to a range lane. Give it a try!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i usually do a modified idpa at the range, two 6 inch shoot n see targets at 21 feet/7 yards, unholster and fire six shots, move to the side for cover, reload, move back and 6 more shots on the other target. Try to do it as fast as you can while keeping all shots in. This will train you for unholstering, reloading, and quick target aquisition. I usually can do it in about 4 secs, but at the beginning it was though to get all shots in the targets. I think this is about as good you can do when confined to a range lane. Give it a try!
right on 4 that info . I`ma try that indeed. Sounds like fun .
 

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When I go to the range, I'll usually have a series of drills to brush up for IDPA matches. I don't do all of these at 1 trip:

-- Mozambique drills (2 to body, 1 to head) at 7 and 10 yards. Start by drawing from holster
-- Sight practice-- focusing on target (I only do at 10 yards and less) and having my sights in my peripheral vision, front sight focus for targets 10-25 yards away (max distance at my range)
-- Shooting at the backstop without a target-- here I'm only focusing on my front sight and watching it move as it goes through the recoil. The goal is to see if I can keep my grip and trigger pull consistent enough that the front sight will drop back into the notch after recoiling. i'm still working on this...
-- Shooting with strong hand / weak hand
-- Shooting with a reverse grip-- I usually shoot right handed, sometimes I'll shoot with my left hand as the "strong" hand with my right hand as the support hand.
-- "Bill drills" -- firing a string of 5-6 shots as rapidly as possible
-- Reload with retention practice -- fire xx shots, release mag before running dry, slamming a new mag home and firing a followup shot
-- Drawing from a holster and firing off a shot
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
When I go to the range, I'll usually have a series of drills to brush up for IDPA matches. I don't do all of these at 1 trip:

-- Mozambique drills (2 to body, 1 to head) at 7 and 10 yards. Start by drawing from holster
-- Sight practice-- focusing on target (I only do at 10 yards and less) and having my sights in my peripheral vision, front sight focus for targets 10-25 yards away (max distance at my range)
-- Shooting at the backstop without a target-- here I'm only focusing on my front sight and watching it move as it goes through the recoil. The goal is to see if I can keep my grip and trigger pull consistent enough that the front sight will drop back into the notch after recoiling. i'm still working on this...
-- Shooting with strong hand / weak hand
-- Shooting with a reverse grip-- I usually shoot right handed, sometimes I'll shoot with my left hand as the "strong" hand with my right hand as the support hand.
-- "Bill drills" -- firing a string of 5-6 shots as rapidly as possible
-- Reload with retention practice -- fire xx shots, release mag before running dry, slamming a new mag home and firing a followup shot
-- Drawing from a holster and firing off a shot
right on pistol competitor for that info indeed .
 

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Since the majority of my range shooting is indoors, I just try to concentrate on fundamentals. Target acquisition and being smooth and consistent especially when drawing from the holster are things I work on and mostly at 7 yards. Sure some times I'll just do 25 yard accuracy or play "pick the body part (especially when the wife and I shoot together for some friendly competition) But normally I try to do it the same every time smoothly until muscle memory takes over. Then I'll try draw and shoot from a different stance, off handed, cross draw and occasionally weak handed. I've found for me, slow and smooth practice eventually leads to speed and accuracy.
 

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Move, draw, fire. Repeat from the other side of the booth.

Obviously, you should seek some training in the various ways to safety and quickly draw a handgun if you have never done so before. It's too easy to shoot yourself (especially in the hand). Do yourself a favor and do none of this without at least getting an hour or so of training from the local tactics guy at your range. I recommend a two day class, but I also realize many people won't go that far. Doing all of this slowly is a very good idea.

You can also do all of this at home with a good Airsoft pistol. I use a KWA Glock 19 with heavy Airsoft BBs.


Move:

Even if the movement is only one step from one side of the shooting booth to the other (and/or diagonally), you're programming your brain to get out of the way of incoming bullets first. The reason is that the good guy is usually reacting to an attack that has already started. If you're able to identify the situation, then a preemptive draw should have already been initiated and initiative will be equal.

Additionally, you're forcing the goblin to assess the situation. The goblin had a plan for you in that spot and you're not cooperating. DANG GUN PEOPLE! This is called getting into his OODA loop. The time you generate while the goblin's brain is stuck processing may mean you fire the fight ending shot.


Draw:

By drawing during the move, you're teaching your brain to find the grip of your gun while the body is in motion. Obviously, it would be better to have a five yard wide booth so you can explode off your location, but that's not available to most people. When you do so, make sure to lean forward. This may cause them to miss if their aim had been true.

The "Get off the X" topic is huge and generates many arguments. Screw all that. Get Airsoft and try it until you figure it out.

Draw to the target. The muzzle points at the target as soon as possible. Obviously, many ranges will not allow this. It's also dangerous and you'll need to be aware of your body in relation to the muzzle. I recommend super slow draws progressing to slow draws (max). You'll do a fast draw in a fight.

Again, this is controversial. There are people ("sport shooters") who will flat out state you are wrong and violating safety rules. They're forgetting that there are no safety rules in a gun fight. This does not deter them in perpetuating the argument. Odds are "sport shooters" are in charge of the range. If they object, just nod and go back to static shooting. Find a better range for the next outing.


Fire:

Mix it up. Fire singles, controlled pairs, double taps, failures, and zippers. Do so while moving from left to right and right to left. Change hands midstep (which means you need to learn how to transition a handgun from one hand to the other) and fire.

Don't worry about firing while moving in the booth. It's too small. I typically don't get a shot off for 1-2 steps; that's fine. The idea here is to ingrain the sequence: move, draw, fire rather than stand, draw, fire.

MAKE SURE TO PLAY IN YOUR MIND A GOBLIN POINTING A GUN AT YOU AND THAT YOU'RE TRYING TO DODGE THEIR AIM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Move, draw, fire. Repeat from the other side of the booth.

Obviously, you should seek some training in the various ways to safety and quickly draw a handgun if you have never done so before. It's too easy to shoot yourself (especially in the hand). Do yourself a favor and do none of this without at least getting an hour or so of training from the local tactics guy at your range. I recommend a two day class, but I also realize many people won't go that far. Doing all of this slowly is a very good idea.

You can also do all of this at home with a good Airsoft pistol. I use a KWA Glock 19 with heavy Airsoft BBs.

Move:

Even if the movement is only one step from one side of the shooting booth to the other (and/or diagonally), you're programming your brain to get out of the way of incoming bullets first. The reason is that the good guy is usually reacting to an attack that has already started. If you're able to identify the situation, then a preemptive draw should have already been initiated and initiative will be equal.

Additionally, you're forcing the goblin to assess the situation. The goblin had a plan for you in that spot and you're not cooperating. DANG GUN PEOPLE! This is called getting into his OODA loop. The time you generate while the goblin's brain is stuck processing may mean you fire the fight ending shot.

Draw:

By drawing during the move, you're teaching your brain to find the grip of your gun while the body is in motion. Obviously, it would be better to have a five yard wide booth so you can explode off your location, but that's not available to most people. When you do so, make sure to lean forward. This may cause them to miss if their aim had been true.

The "Get off the X" topic is huge and generates many arguments. Screw all that. Get Airsoft and try it until you figure it out.

Draw to the target. The muzzle points at the target as soon as possible. Obviously, many ranges will not allow this. It's also dangerous and you'll need to be aware of your body in relation to the muzzle. I recommend super slow draws progressing to slow draws (max). You'll do a fast draw in a fight.

Again, this is controversial. There are people ("sport shooters") who will flat out state you are wrong and violating safety rules. They're forgetting that there are no safety rules in a gun fight. This does not deter them in perpetuating the argument. Odds are "sport shooters" are in charge of the range. If they object, just nod and go back to static shooting. Find a better range for the next outing.

Fire:

Mix it up. Fire singles, controlled pairs, double taps, failures, and zippers. Do so while moving from left to right and right to left. Change hands midstep (which means you need to learn how to transition a handgun from one hand to the other) and fire.

Don't worry about firing while moving in the booth. It's too small. I typically don't get a shot off for 1-2 steps; that's fine. The idea here is to ingrain the sequence: move, draw, fire rather than stand, draw, fire.

MAKE SURE TO PLAY IN YOUR MIND A GOBLIN POINTING A GUN AT YOU AND THAT YOU'RE TRYING TO DODGE THEIR AIM.
right on 4 that info indeed .
 
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