Glock Pro Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
918 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I went to the range today and I put about 200 rounds through my G23. At first I was all over the place.. More like down to the left, but I improved as rounds went down range. I haven't shot often, or a lot at all really. Maybe I just need to shoot more.

Does anyone have any tips on improving Accuracy?

What is considered a good grouping size?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
Sometimes i'll anticipate the recoil as I shoot.. causing me to shoot off target - a good way to help improve that is to dryfire a LOT.. dryfiring is fine with Glocks.. and a great way to practice your shooting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
it's not how many shots you put downrange but how many quality shots are on target, in a decent groups, so i don't say "today i'm firing 200 rounds" but have it quality time at shorter ranges.

i use targets with 4 animals/targets in the corners, starting at 7 yards with a single shot in each target, then double tap each target until it comes naturally.

i can live with 2" at 15 yards, some folks want it tighter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
The Key is to diagnose your shots. You stated that your shots are low left. Pretty sure your right handed.

Low left accounts for 90 percent of shooting problems. or low right if the shooter is left handed.

The Problem? Trigger control maybe with a little anticipation.

Your mashing the trigger, or the "sights are on, Go now" causing the gun to be pushed low left. Dry fire practice very rarely fixes this. The reason is, during dry fire practice you know that the gun is empty and not going to go bang. ive seen students do dry fire perfect 50 times, trigger breaks and no movement.

Then as soon as we go live they're mashing the trigger again.

The best way to over come this is with ball and dummy drills. Load some dummy rounds in your mags and practice very slow fire drills.

Pull up, smooth straight back trigger press until the shot breaks, hold the trigger back, take a breath, slowly release the trigger just until the "click" which is the reset, Proper sight picture, and repeat.

What you'll see is when you get a dummy in the chamber is a a click and you'll see the muzzle float low left. just keep focusing on proper sight alignment and a smooth even pressure trigger pull.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
There's some stuff to be learned online and through reading, look up handgun fundamentals. The problem is leafing through the BS and getting the good stuff, there's a lot of people out there who claim to know how to teach firearms...but can't.

A fundamentals class may be the best money you'll ever spend.

Like Keith said low left is flinching. I do it a lot too, and it pisses me off. Best way to get rid of it, like Keith said is dummy rounds. It works. But keep up on it, I haven't been doing it for the past few months and the flinch is coming back. It's a PITA to get rid of.

It's all in the trigger control as far as accuracy goes. Once you speed things up then grip comes into play (for getting sights back on target faster) then body control once you're moving. Do it in steps and master the fundamentals before moving forward, it's difficult to incorporate more advanced techniques in your practice when the fundamentals aren't 100%.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
anticipating the recoil and pushing the gun .... dry fire practice.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
608 Posts
I came up with a simple, little shooting game. Its basically Horse with bullets instead of basket balls. The local gun club/range has a, what they call "Trash Target Range". Its 25 yards in length and depth and littered with shell holders, ammo boxes, cans, plastic bottles, you name it. I came up with it to help teach myself how to shoot well. In playing this game, if its done right, it forces a shooter to work on their fundamentals; stance, grip, posture, breathing, sight picture, trigger control, ect, ect. It really makes a shooter slow down and take time, making you teach yourself how to make the good shot.

So, to play, you need 2 or more shooters. Ive only played with two, so heres how I do it. Whom ever starts a round, calls their target, unless all shooters miss called target in which case its shot at again in the next round.

Shooter 1 - Shooter 2
Hit Hit Shooter 1 starts next round, calls new target, both get points
Hit Miss Shooter 1 starts next round,calls new target, Shooter 1 gets point
Miss Hit Shooter 2 starts next round,calls new target, Shooter 2 gets point
Miss Miss No points, whoever started the round, starts again at the missed target
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
anticipating the recoil and pushing the gun .... dry fire practice.
Ok, not trying to be a jerk here but:

If your saying that he is anticipating the recoil, That would be a mindset issue, correct?

He's waiting for the bang, anticipating it and causing a flinch.

So how would dry fire practice where you KNOW the gun isnt going to go bang help with anticipating the bang?

your taking the cause of the problem away, of course your going to do 100 reps perfectly.

You have to break the habit using live fire mixed with dummies, work through the issue not remove it. That way your brain DOESNT KNOW if its going to go bang or not. And when it doesnt you get the instant feed back and can correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Ok, not trying to be a jerk here but:

If your saying that he is anticipating the recoil, That would be a mindset issue, correct?

He's waiting for the bang, anticipating it and causing a flinch.

So how would dry fire practice where you KNOW the gun isnt going to go bang help with anticipating the bang?

your taking the cause of the problem away, of course your going to do 100 reps perfectly.

You have to break the habit using live fire mixed with dummies, work through the issue not remove it. That way your brain DOESNT KNOW if its going to go bang or not. And when it doesnt you get the instant feed back and can correct.
OK, your not a jerk. :p

It helps with muscle memory and also teaches the mind to forget about the "bang". It also teaches you the Glock trigger .....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Trigger reset is one thing, but over coming the "bang" can only be over came with the gun going "bang"

And trust me ive been called worse :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
How about both dryfiring (great thing to do in the house.. (bathroom.. sitting position?)) And mixing in dummy rounds at your range..

I see benefits from both.

Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
How about both dryfiring (great thing to do in the house.. (bathroom.. sitting position?)) And mixing in dummy rounds at your range..

I see benefits from both.

Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk
You got that right ......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
918 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks guys, great information like always..

I went out tonight and got some snap caps "dummy loads" I'm going to dry fire at home then add some dummy loads in my shooting at the range.

I'll keep you guys updated. Thanks again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
Most important part of dryfiring is check to make sure it's not loaded.. then point at something you wouldn't mind destroying.

Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
What worked for me was to fire 2 to 3 rounds rapidly.By the time i got to the 3rd shot any anticipation or flinch i had was gone.I didn't worry about grouping when i was doing this,as long as birds didn't fall from the sky and every thing was at least center mass i was fine with it.I saved the grouping for another day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
how is lightening the trigger pull going to help with proper trigger technique and anticipating the recoil?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
608 Posts
how is lightening the trigger pull going to help with proper trigger technique and anticipating the recoil?
Wouldn't do much for anticipation, but could help with technique. Sometimes a heavy trigger can be harder for some shooters to use. I had a buddy who had a G22 with an NY2 trigger spring setup in it, and when he would start to apply trigger pull pressure, the pull was so heavy that he would jerk/flinch because he couldn't keep a slow steady pull. I swapped the NY2 out for a factory S spring and did a .25 cent trigger job on it, and my buddy turned into a force to be reckoned with after the trigger was lightned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top