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Oh yeah. Got mine last week it is currently installed in my gen 3 19. Shorter take up and reset, unbelievable break. Typical glock reset which is the best in my opinion. What Timney has done here is reinvent the glock trigger as we know it. It went from a gritty spongy trigger with a violent break that throws your sight picture off if youre not ready for it. To a smooth system that gives you way more control over the trigger. All youre doing now is just releasing a pre cocked firing pin. Instead of cocking it by pressing the trigger then releasing it. And it also confirmed what I suspected all along with the glock trigger system. All that sponge and grit that we have been trying to polish and tune out over the years was in fact coming mostly from the cocking/compressing of the firing pin and the scraping of the spring against the channel liner that you cannot polish or tune out. Well thats all history with this trigger system. The trigger is a little light for duty/carry I wont lie. I am not into competition shooting cause there is no competition shooting where I live. But I believe with a 8 lb connector a 5 lb trigger can be had. Right now its 3.2 pounds with a unmarked 5 lb connector. Anyway whenever I can score some damn ammo ill go to the range and give a more detailed report.

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I looked these up and it's the first time I've seen a truly new design for a Glock so I ordered it (first time paying full price for an aftermarket trigger). It came today FedEx and I initially installed it into a G17 Gen3 cutaway so I could observe the inner workings. My cutaway had a minus connector in it and I left it that way.

I think the idea is ingenious but as an armorer, I'm having some issues with it.

1) The only forward pressure on the trigger is the small wire spring that gets installed next to the slide stop lever. What I noticed was if I put very slight pressure on the trigger then released it - it stayed towards the rear with the firing pin safety in a disarmed state. So 2 of the 3 Glock safeties are disarmed and did not reset when I took my finger off the trigger.

2) The unit that has the lug which holds the firing pin to the rear is entirely dependent upon it's own spring to keep the firing pin from releasing. This would make the Glock drop safety irrelevant. The only thing ensuring the firing pin does not release is the trigger system's own spring.

Taken together, the gun could be potentially unsafe. The trigger can be in a position that disarms the trigger safety and firing pin safety and the system doesn't use the drop safety, all it would need is a good jolt opposite the TMH unit to fire the gun. A little disconcerting for something promoted by Shane Coley. I'll try to reach out to Timney this weekend and see what they say. I also need to put it in one of my other Glocks to ensure the issue repeats.

As far as the feel of the trigger - definitely going to have to use a standard connector. With the minus connector I got an average trigger pull of 2lbs 5oz - that's insanely light (too light in my opinion) for a Glock. I can't feel any wall. I don't fault the trigger for that, I just think it's the wrong combination. Somewhere I have a Ghost Angel connector - it also has no wall, I'll have to try that also just to see how insane it gets. I'll also test a + connector to see how it feels but I think the standard connector is what this is really designed for.

I don't see any way this should be used for a SD gun given that it negates one of Glock's safeties even if I hadn't experience the first issue. I want to test it more before making my mind up about it for competition/range toy.
 

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After reading the review about the new Timney trigger I bought one for my G19. Installed it and made it to the range Thursday. Ran 50 rounds through it and it functioned perfectly. Used the stock striker spring and an Apex connector 3.2. With the stock striker spring was getting a deep indentation on the primers no more worrying about having to lighten the striker spring to get a lighter trigger pull. Trigger pull was averaging 2lb 10oz crisp break and quick clean reset. No issues with the trigger not resetting. As smooth as the trigger bar was I slightly polished the edges where it contacted the connector and the striker lug. Put a very thin layer of grease on the trigger bar to connector and striker lug areas. Defiantly a different trigger concept for a Glock.

Trigger to light for a carry or HD gun but you can tune the trigger weight by using different connectors. The trigger return spring is a torsion spring made out of .029 diameter wire. I have some .032 wire and I think I will make a spring out of .032 and see what it feels like with a slightly heaver trigger return spring. It defiantly makes the G19 into more of a fun range toy.
 

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Yeah its obvious looking at this video and studying the design that none of the safety's are being defeated. As long as the trigger is working properly.

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I just put this together, it's quick and dirty but maybe it will help understand the lack of a drop safety.


I should add here (I put it in the description of the video but that doesn't show if watched within the forum) - a LOT has to go wrong to actually discharge the weapon with a drop, it's not going to be common but because they are entirely dependent on only the spring to ensure the engagement of the firing pin lug it is possible. What is more likely would be the firing pin hits the firing pin safety. That is why I will still use the trigger in a range gun.

I don't think it will take much for Timney to fix the sticking issue and I fully expect a company like theirs will come up with some sort of a solution to the drop safety. We'll see how long it takes for version 2 to come out.
 

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I just put this together, it's quick and dirty but maybe it will help understand the lack of a drop safety.

Yep youre right. As youve shown in that video the sear being independent of the trigger bar raises another issue. That spring could depress by a strong whack to the butt. My trigger however hasnt stuck once on me but it came from the factory adjusted with too little take up and was pressing on the plunger safety right out of the box. I had to back out the trigger adjustment screw almost all the way to free it up. Hmmm ya got me rethinking this trigger. Definitely wont be carrying it. Like you said "range use only" until they rethink this. Thanks man you rock.

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Excellent analysis and video MtStream...

I'm curious to see how the USPSA handles this new Timney trigger... USPSA rules require the primary safety to function... On a Glock the trigger safety is the primary safety, so it seems that it will meet their rules criteria... Interesting to see if they tighten things up after the CZ disaster earlier this year.
 

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Its been my experience that if something is possible however unlikely to go wrong it will. Murphys law pretty much. As was shown it would take a whack to the gun to depress the spring and sear (I guess its called) then a depressed trigger at the same time to go boom. Well there's a lot of scenarios I can think of for this to occur. But my brain is already thinking of ways designs to make it 100% drop safe. So I am sure Timney has too.

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Just as a follow up. I took the Timney in my Gen4 17c to show a buddy while he was doing some upgrades on a shotgun for me.

I decided to try jarring it with a rubber mallet on the top of the slide. The gun is one of my favorites and has Dawson sights so I didn’t go crazy but the connection with the firing pin lug clearly changed with the first hit and released with the third.


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Just as a follow up. I took the Timney in my Gen4 17c to show a buddy while he was doing some upgrades on a shotgun for me.

I decided to try jarring it with a rubber mallet on the top of the slide. The gun is one of my favorites and has Dawson sights so I didn’t go crazy but the connection with the firing pin lug clearly changed with the first hit and released with the third.


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Absolutely doesn't surprise me. This trigger has so much potential but has a glaring issue that I personally wont overlook. It got yanked out of my pistol, its going to stay in my safe period. I dont need a sig p320 accidental discharged story in my life. Sorry Timney good swing but a miss.

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Just as a follow up. I took the Timney in my Gen4 17c to show a buddy while he was doing some upgrades on a shotgun for me.

I decided to try jarring it with a rubber mallet on the top of the slide. The gun is one of my favorites and has Dawson sights so I didn’t go crazy but the connection with the firing pin lug clearly changed with the first hit and released with the third.


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This is very interesting. Thank you for taking the time to post. I have Timney’s in three competition guns (2 G19s and one G17 (dedicated to a SBR PCCO). All three at 2.5# trigger pull. I’m really liking these triggers and will keep using them for competition matches but after reading your post I need to make a change on “Make Ready” command. I have a routine where after inserting mag and chambering a round, I tap the bottom of the mag to make sure it seated well, and tap back of slide to make sure it went fully into battery. I think from now on I will do this BEFORE chambering a round 🙂. Thanks again for your post. I will also be doing some drop safety experiments on my Timney’s.
 

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This is very interesting. Thank you for taking the time to post. I have Timney’s in three competition guns (2 G19s and one G17 (dedicated to a SBR PCCO). All three at 2.5# trigger pull. I’m really liking these triggers and will keep using them for competition matches but after reading your post I need to make a change on “Make Ready” command. I have a routine where after inserting mag and chambering a round, I tap the bottom of the mag to make sure it seated well, and tap back of slide to make sure it went fully into battery. I think from now on I will do this BEFORE chambering a round 🙂. Thanks again for your post. I will also be doing some drop safety experiments on my Timney’s.
Edit: Thinking more about this, I think I need to experiment with my “make ready” routine using my armorers back plate to see if tapping bottom of mag and back of slide causes any movement on the connection with the firing pin lug. It would not be good if there were enough movement where the lug was just barely holding where holstering and drawing was enough movement to release the striker prematurely. Any other suggestions you may have to further experiment with this issue would be appreciated.
 

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Just as a follow up. I took the Timney in my Gen4 17c to show a buddy while he was doing some upgrades on a shotgun for me.

I decided to try jarring it with a rubber mallet on the top of the slide. The gun is one of my favorites and has Dawson sights so I didn’t go crazy but the connection with the firing pin lug clearly changed with the first hit and released with the third.


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When the firing pin lug released on the third whack, would the safety plunger stop it from discharging a round? Is there a (safe) way to test this?
 

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When the firing pin lug released on the third whack, would the safety plunger stop it from discharging a round? Is there a (safe) way to test this?
The firing pin safety should prevent the discharge of a round. But there’s two issues to keep in mind

1) the firing pin safety is not 100%
Glock has improved the design of the firing pin safety a few times over the years but it’s still a mechanical part operated by a small spring. Glock warns in their manual that every mechanical part will fail at some point.

2) the lack of a drop safety will test the firing pin safety more than a stock Glock would. A different way to say this is a factory Glock would not normally have to depend on the firing pin safety to stop it from discharging from a drop.

I have played around with this setup a bit more. I found a warning in an old Glock manual that the Glock could discharge if dropped on its nose. Glock has since upgraded the parts to prevent this but I took it as an indication that the weak point was the nose of the gun and not the butt.

I found that dropping the gun on a padded carpet floor from below my waist was enough to cause the firing pin to release about every 3-10 tries. I suspect the angle of the drop is more important than the force as it pertains to the Timney releasing the firing pin.

To check the firing pin safety, I placed a piece of tape over the face of the slide so it would indicate if the firing pin had penetrated. I have not had a failure of the firing pin but I haven’t dropped from higher than my waist. I would expect the current firing pin safety design would need more force than the Timney does.

I still use the Timney in a competition gun and enjoy it, I just wouldn’t want to carry it as a self defense gun where I might be in a physical altercation.


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The firing pin safety should prevent the discharge of a round. But there’s two issues to keep in mind

1) the firing pin safety is not 100%
Glock has improved the design of the firing pin safety a few times over the years but it’s still a mechanical part operated by a small spring. Glock warns in their manual that every mechanical part will fail at some point.

2) the lack of a drop safety will test the firing pin safety more than a stock Glock would. A different way to say this is a factory Glock would not normally have to depend on the firing pin safety to stop it from discharging from a drop.

I have played around with this setup a bit more. I found a warning in an old Glock manual that the Glock could discharge if dropped on its nose. Glock has since upgraded the parts to prevent this but I took it as an indication that the weak point was the nose of the gun and not the butt.

I found that dropping the gun on a padded carpet floor from below my waist was enough to cause the firing pin to release about every 3-10 tries. I suspect the angle of the drop is more important than the force as it pertains to the Timney releasing the firing pin.

To check the firing pin safety, I placed a piece of tape over the face of the slide so it would indicate if the firing pin had penetrated. I have not had a failure of the firing pin but I haven’t dropped from higher than my waist. I would expect the current firing pin safety design would need more force than the Timney does.

I still use the Timney in a competition gun and enjoy it, I just wouldn’t want to carry it as a self defense gun where I might be in a physical altercation.


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Thank you for the additional information. I also found your YouTube video on this issue. Very well done. Very happy with Timney for competition matches but based on your thorough analysis I will definitely keep the drop safety issue in mind and act accordingly 👍
 
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