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OK - what is the truth on the Tenifer issue?
Is it still being applied to current Austrian Glocks?
Are Tenifer guns being imported into the U.S.?
Is the Tenifer process being used in U.S. production?
If not Tenifer, what hardening process is being used in U.S. production?
Are Glocks having any hardening process currently imported into the U.S.?

Thanks for sharing any knowledge!
 

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OK - what is the truth on the Tenifer issue?
Is it still being applied to current Austrian Glocks?
Are Tenifer guns being imported into the U.S.?
Is the Tenifer process being used in U.S. production?
If not Tenifer, what hardening process is being used in U.S. production?
Are Glocks having any hardening process currently imported into the U.S.?

Thanks for sharing any knowledge!
I sure wish I had a clear answer for you, all I have is bits and pieces that I've found on the web. I've read that Tenifer is no longer being used because of some environmental concerns about toxic waste byproducts, but that a new process with equally good results is being used instead.

Let's see if anyone with first-hand information on this comes forward, we have a few people in the Atlanta area with some connections at Glock, perhaps they can provide correct answers.

Chris
 

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I believe that Glock changed from Tenifer to Melonite around 2011, although I'm not sure of the date. Both Tenifer and Melonite are a nitride process (ferric nitrocarborizing?) From what I heard, they switched to Melonite, which is a different name brand of ferric nitrocarborizing. Interestingly, they're both sold by the same company.

Tennifer uses cyanide as a medium and is either illegal to use in the U.S. or is strictly regulated (with obvious good reason). Melonite uses a different medium and is much more common here and is probably catching on in Europe.

What is most important is that regardless the brand name of the processing chemical, the metal is protected just the same! And yes, Glock puts a cosmetic top coat on top of this.

Smith and Wesson uses Melonite on some of their pistols and they are widely believed to be impervious to the elements (google S&W 4566 Melonite) and see just how popular that finish is.
 

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Call Glock in Smyrna, GA and ask. If you want the correct answer ask TheLaw.
I bet he can answer all your questions. I have no idea!
 

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I do know there's a difference. My 27 and my 23 have different coatings on them. Both are Austrian and not USA made but you can visibly see the difference.
 

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I took pictures of both but to tell you the truth, the camera doesn't really pick up the difference. The 23's finish is just a little lighter than the 27's. I'll have to look at born on dates next.
 

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I do know there's a difference. My 27 and my 23 have different coatings on them. Both are Austrian and not USA made but you can visibly see the difference.
Any visible difference wouldn't be the nitride process (Tenifer or Melonite) as those are "in" the metal. The finish of the slide is a coating applied after metal treatment. Glock did go to a different finish, the older guns are a more shiny black finish.

Both finishes are very durable. The cosmetics is preference.
 

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Any visible difference wouldn't be the nitride process (Tenifer or Melonite) as those are "in" the metal. The finish of the slide is a coating applied after metal treatment. Glock did go to a different finish, the older guns are a more shiny black finish.

Both finishes are very durable. The cosmetics is preference.
The "shiny" finish was actually the "new" finish. After numerous complaints of rainbow oil slick like reflections and slippery to too shiny, they went back to the original finish. Known to many as the "new" finish when all they did was go back to the original finish.

Not many people were happy with the new shiny finish. I don't care either way, they both wear off.
 

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What is most important is that regardless the brand name of the processing chemical, the metal is protected just the same! Smith and Wesson uses Melonite on some of their pistols and they are widely believed to be impervious to the elements (google S&W 4566 Melonite) and see just how popular that finish is.
If this is the case why are there so many cases of Smith & Wesson Melonite pistols rusting? Many Springfield XD pistols have suffered the same fate. You all but NEVER hear of Glock's rusting that have been treated with Tennifer. The processes while similar, are in fact different.

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=smith+&+wesson+m&p+pistols+rusting

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Springfield+XD+pistols+rusting
 

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1. How do you know that all those pistols are ruston? 2. If they are rusting, it's because Glock does it better
:cool:
I've seen more than a few in person rust, some were very bad. The problem is they do it to stainless. The process changes the surface composition enough that if not done right it will make that "stainless" rust just by looking at it. I've never seen an XD rust that was surface treated, but I've heard of it. I've actually seen more glocks with surface rust than XD pistols with surface rust, it that's the law of averages. The shear number of Glocks compared to XD pistols is big.

I've had an XD9 since 2002 and it is original cast slide, no melonite, two piece pinned together barrel with cerakote. The paint is wearing off because I use it constantly. Best part about my early XD9 is it used the HS2000 3.5# trigger pull weight. Less than half that of the current ones. Dang thing is reliable and accurate.
 

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There's a discussion on a sight dedicated to metal finishes that asked the same question about the S&Ws. A product manager stated it was the metal they used and they corrected the problem with a change in the metal, not a change in treatment.
 

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I used to work on boats in salt water environment.

When a new boat was put into service I was called out to work on a piece of equipment on-top of the wheelhouse that was made of stainless steel. The boat had only been in service less than 6 months and the stainless had surface rust on it ... lots of it !


Surface rust is just that, on the surface, meaning it can be removed easily and has not penetrated the integrity of the metal yet.


Where I live nothing is impervious to surface rust, and if it is not strong enough, degradation rust will take it over very quickly !
 
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