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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So we all know that both are important. All of you instructors and knowledgeable pistoleers, let's share how we train to get both. For me, one of the ways is of course repetition. For something I believe isn't taught enough, the draw from concealment: Doing it the right way slowly (with dummy rounds / snap caps) and escalating the pace. Focusing without losing focus of what's around. Often I'll give myself cues. The TV is very useful here - relaxed, focus, then the next male who appears on screen, the moment of the next scene shift, next blond women who appears, etc.

Thoughts, ideas, etc., etc., etc?
 

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This is what Ive dont so far to achieve my BSA.

First of all is learning good techniques. you can hand a gun to almost anyone and say,"Draw this from this holster put 5 rounds on target reload and put 5 more on." and they would probably be able to do it. Are you doing it "wrong" per say? No, But are you doing it in the most efficient way?

So first off is seek out good trainers and take some good classes to learn. Look in to what qualifies them to instruct. What do they do to update themselves on the latest techniques. There are a lot of trainers out there still teaching outdated slower techniques they learned 20 years ago in the MIL or LEO circle. Also just because some one is LEO, Competition shooter or EX Delta recon ranger sniper seal team 6 member doesn't necessarily mean they are the best instructor for civilian shooting and carry techniques. Just as you wouldn't ask the common CPL holder what your going to need to do to bust doors down in Iraq. Different needs means different instruction.

Once you learn the proper techniques, slow down and work on the fundamentals. Most students enter their first "advanced" class thinking that they're going to get some secret squirrel knowledge bestowed upon them. and are then surprised when they find the truth.

Here is is folks...here's the secrets....Its all fundamentals...period. What sets the guys apart that are crazy fast and accurate with guns are that they have beat the hell out of the fundamentals.

Dont start to fast. Start out training on the basics. Proper draw, proper grip, proper trigger control, proper reloads, and proper malfunction clearance. Practice them. You would be amazed at what 15 min every morning practicing weapons manipulation with snap caps will do for how you run the gun.

!5 min every morning after gearing up I'll take 3 mags loaded with snap caps and practice draw strokes, FFD's, and reloads both speed and admin. It gets me used to the feel, sight picture and keeps everything fresh in your mind. you can do this stuff everyday, all day, for free. that way you dont have to burn rounds working on it. at the range you can use your rounds to work on things that takes live rounds to accomplish

When you go to the range, go with a purpose. Most people go out and just burn through a bunch of rounds and never really do anything.

I usually start every session with a dot torture drill. This is a slow methodical exercise that focuses just on trigger control and sight alignment. After that I will work on what ever Im there to do. Movement, multiple targets cover, reloads, whatever. Then finish with another dot torture as a kind of cool down.

But even though we think we may be doing something right in our minds we may not be. I always recommend taking at least 1 or 2 good classes a year. most will only cost only a few hundred plus ammo and will keep you up to date on new techniques. And having a good instructor there to smoth out any issues is priceless.


So in summary, learn the right techniques, practice them, apply them. its a pretty simple thing. Unfortunately as humans, especially men, we dont like to be told that we are doing something wrong. So most wont seek out instruction. So most continue to hurt themselves with bad techniques.

Remember practice doesnt make perfect. perfect practice makes perfect.


Keith
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There's an extremely good point in that litany of training (actually all of it's good)........but even instructors need instructors. We sometimes lose sight of what we are trying to accomplish and will overwhelm our students with "info dump". Good basics make great shooters. Tks Keith

Tim
 

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KeithD hit it with the term "efficiency". Efficiency is the same thing, at least to me, as "economy of movement" meaning don't move parts of you that don't need moving. Watch people draw, and you will see them do all sorts of contortions and happy dances trying to get their gun out and on target.

Watch the pros, and you will see smoothness with only the parts needed to make the draw moving.

Break the draw down into three basic components: access, withdrawal, and presentation. Practice it over and over by the numbers until you get it down pat.
 

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Remember this mantra: From Steve Fisher from MP.

Fast to the gun, sure of your grip. Fast to the target, Sure of your shot.

I love that. People rush to get the gun out and end up having a improper grip. Then rush to the target just to smoke a round off for the sake of quickness ending in a miss or less than ideal shot placement.
 

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Once you learn the proper techniques, slow down and work on the fundamentals. Most students enter their first "advanced" class thinking that they're going to get some secret squirrel knowledge bestowed upon them. and are then surprised when they find the truth.
"secret squirrel knowledge"

You're on a roll tonight, Keith...
 

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Excellent thread.

I use the TV much like the OP. I use it to help with quick sight acquisition and smooth trigger press when dry firing. I need to step up my dry re-load drills though. I am lazy about that but need to work more.

I also very much agree I was surprised to see how little difference there is/was between novice and more advanced classes. It's much the same skills and drills taught in different ways and at different speeds.

An instructor I've taken from uses the mantra, "THE FUNDAMENTALS ALWAYS EXIST."
 
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