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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know a lot of you are already into reloading and familiar with equipment.

I want this for Christmas so must get my list together.

Want small multistage press, dies, resizer...

What do I need? My brass is very clean, do I need a tumbler to get started too?

Please offer list for starter kit (this is for 10mm)

Thanks for all your help guys!!!
 

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To be honest for a progressive I use Dillon but they are more expensive. This one will come with what you need in the press all at one whack it looks like. Plus I know guys that use them and have nothing bad to say about them. I know I like their single stages just fine but never used one of their progressives myself.
http://cgi.ebay.com/LEE-10mm-Auto-L...871?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5ad5ccbb07

You will also want a tumbler and seperator. Just a simple sift pan will do it if all your doing in 10mm. But after looking at the link again I would look at his feedback carefully before doing business with them. You get the idea though
 
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good thread, glocknewb!

i've never reloaded, but i've read a little bit on the subject.

i've noticed that dillon presses are considered good stuff by many folks, as sfguard mentioned :)


sf, how are the cheaper lee presses? good stuff too?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great answer SF and thanks for the link.

Don the link provided by SF goes to a complete Lee setup :) Santy Claws is comin
 

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The short answer, for a complete set of equipment including a SINGLE STAGE PRESS, is about $800, the attached file is a detailed list.

The press type is important, because while a single stage press is cheaper than a progressive press or a multi-stage reloading machine, reloading with a single stage is a whole lot slower than using a progressive press. For rifle reloading, this isn't a big deal, because I think it's fair to say that most rifle shooters don't use ammunition in volumes even approaching what competitive (action) pistol shooters use.

Of course, progressive presses or multi-stage reloading machines are more expensive than single stage presses. There's that old "time is money" adage, again.

Now, you can do without some of this stuff initially, but I think this is about where you'll end up. I've done quit a bit of research on this topic (mainly for rifles) and I've even written a book about it, so my comments aren't just off the cuff. Remember, this is only a list of equipment. You will also need primers, powder, and bullets, as well as a place to set up the press and store all of the equipment.

Your $800 will buy you about 32 boxes (1600 rounds) of 10mm ammunition, assuming you can get it for around $25 per box. So the question becomes, how fast are you going to use up that much ammunition?

Chris

View attachment Pistol Reloading List.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The short answer, for a complete set of equipment including a SINGLE STAGE PRESS, is about $800, the attached file is a detailed list.

The press type is important, because while a single stage press is cheaper than a progressive press or a multi-stage reloading machine, reloading with a single stage is a whole lot slower than using a progressive press. For rifle reloading, this isn't a big deal, because I think it's fair to say that most rifle shooters don't use ammunition in volumes even approaching what competitive (action) pistol shooters use.

Of course, progressive presses or multi-stage reloading machines are more expensive than single stage presses. There's that old "time is money" adage, again.

Now, you can do without some of this stuff initially, but I think this is about where you'll end up. I've done quit a bit of research on this topic (mainly for rifles) and I've even written a book about it, so my comments aren't just off the cuff. Remember, this is only a list of equipment. You will also need primers, powder, and bullets.

Chris

View attachment 570
Cohland, Thanks for great list!

Were I to pickup something like the link SF provided:
http://cgi.ebay.com/LEE-10mm-Auto-Lo...item5ad5ccbb07
or one a little less expensive like:
http://cgi.ebay.com/LEE-10mm-Auto-P...316?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5ad4ead0d4
what might I still need to add, aside from the actual primers, powder, (I have enough brass to use for awhile) and slugs?

Thanks much for your insight here!!

GN
 

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Cohland, Thanks for great list!

Were I to pickup something like the link SF provided:
http://cgi.ebay.com/LEE-10mm-Auto-Lo...item5ad5ccbb07
or one a little less expensive like:
http://cgi.ebay.com/LEE-10mm-Auto-P...316?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5ad4ead0d4
what might I still need to add, aside from the actual primers, powder, (I have enough brass to use for awhile) and slugs?

Thanks much for your insight here!!

GN
The first link was empty, in the second I could see a Lee kit.

I don't know the details of that kit, so I suggest you go to the Lee website and look it up, see what it contains, and go from there. It looks like it would replace the press, dies, and powder measure from my list, but I'm guessing. You never really know what the packages include until you do some research.

If you have a Cabela's store within driving distance, that would be a great source. They know what they're talking about , and their prices are fair.

As an alternative, others on this board might come back with more knowledge of progressive reloaders, and they could be helpful.

But keep this in mind: 10mm ammo costs about $25 per box. You buy it and put it in the closet until you need it. It has a shelf life of over 50 years. That $800 would buy you 1,600 rounds of ammo, which is quite a bit. If you're planning to burn it up that fast, then reloading might make economic sense. And if you just want to do reloading because it's an interesting craft, then that makes sense, too. But don't go into reloading thinking that you're going to save money doing it, because that's a pretty "iffy" proposition for most people.

Sorry to be so long-winded, I get carried away.

Chris
 

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By the way, Midway USA sells that same kit for $10 less, and they're a very reputable online source. Here's what they say is in the kit:

Press Type: Progressive Press
Auto Index: Yes
Number of Stations: 3
Frame Material: Steel, Cast Aluminum and Polymer
Handle Location: Bottom Right or Left
Die Size Accepted: 7/8"-14 Threaded Dies
Die Bushing Accepted: No
Die Bushing Brand Used: N/A, Utilizes 3 Hole Turrets (Comes with 1)
Spent Primer Collection System:
Ram Stroke: 3-1/2"
Priming Feature: Uses the Lee Pro 1000 Primer Attachment
Number of Mounting Holes: 3
Mounting Hardware Included: No
Additional Features: Extra turrets and shell plate carriers available (sold separately). For reloaders buying this kit who plan to load more than the caliber listed in the description with this press. Please note that the Pro Auto-Disk powder measure (included as part of the kit) will only work with Lee powder-through expanding dies.
Kit Includes: Caliber specific die set: Pistol Calibers include Carbide 3-Die sets, while the Rifle Calibers include Pacesetter 2-Die sets and rifle charging die, Pro Auto-Disk Powder Measure with 4 disks, Pro 1000 Primer attachment, Case Feeder attachment with tubes, Shell plate

HERE ARE THE INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE KIT:

View attachment Pro_1000.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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It looks like you'd need the kit (I'm basing this on Midway's description of the details) plus the following:

a powder scale,
a case trimmer,
a case deburring tool,
a case cleaner (tumbler),
some loading blocks,
a bullet puller,
and a reloading data book.

That would total about $450 plus the press.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Excellent info Cohland. And thanks so much for going the extra with details. Now down to something I can start with...gives me enough info to know what to ask for when I walk into someplace!
 

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good thread, glocknewb!

i've never reloaded, but i've read a little bit on the subject.

i've noticed that dillon presses are considered good stuff by many folks, as sfguard mentioned :)

sf, how are the cheaper lee presses? good stuff too?
I had a nice long response full of good info and the freaken computer burped and now it is gone. Let's try this again shall we and I will try not to leave out anything I had in before.

As far as Lee presses go I only have a single stage Lee press. I have no problems with it at all. I am sure the progressives work fine though. One major difference between the two Lee comes with a 2 year warranty and Dillon a lifetime warranty. (I love my Dillon but it costs a lot more to set up different calibers than with the Lee)

As far as other stuff needed the link I posted came with about everything you would need for 10mm. Except you would need a tumbler, lube, a bullet puller would probably be a good thing to have around, a buldge buster, caliper and the most important of all thing to get.....
A RELOADING GUIDE. I suggest one from a reputable reloading company. I use and like Lymon's reloading guide.

In most guides for rounds are broke down by caliber and bullet weight. You will then see two different powder charges given for each type of powder they list info on. The smaller is the min. and the larger is the max. Never go under the min and never go over the max.

Something else to consider is primers. There are hard primers and soft primers. And ones kinda in the middle. I myself use CCI. They are a hard primer but I have never had any problems with them.

Powder. Boy, I don't know where to begin here. There are LOTS of different types. Some cleaner than others some a lot more expensive and so on. For someone just starting out I would recommend Unique. The reason is unique is a coarse powder that fills the casing almost to the top. This will prevent a accidental double charge. Unlike some of the more fine powders that you can fit 3-4 times the charge into a casing with.

Unique is also in most guides so info on it is easy to acquire. It can be used in Rifles or pistols. The only downside of it.....it's dirty. Your gun will get filthy from shooting it. Be ready to do some cleaning, but it is a great powder to get started with.

Trimmers.....You aren't going to need one for most pistol rounds. Most pistols by the time the casing would expand to the point it would need trimmed you have exceeded the safe number of times the brass could be re-loaded anyway. Rifles however are another story. Rifle brass almost always needs trimmed every time you re-load it.

Before I forget the bulge buster. If you plan to reload for 40s&w or it's parent round the 10mm make sure you put all your casings through a bulge buster EVERY TIME. There is a small bulge that forms just above the rims of some calibers casing worse than others. The 40, and 10 are notorious for it. Basically what happens is every time you reload it and shoot it if you don't put it through the bulge buster that bulge gets bigger. Eventually the round may not chamber all the way. In a non-supported chamber this is very bad because the round will still go off.

This will certainly ruin your range trip and your whole day very quickly.

Reloading is a lot of fun. I make the occasional dollar at it from someone at work (but be careful doing that without a license) I find it therapeutic actually and when everyone else couldn't get ammo at Wally world I had plenty. You can also save $ doing it. Just be careful as it can also be dangerous. The biggest thing is watch your charges. Be careful not to accidentally double a charge. Never leave a casing in the machine. Finish making the round before answering the door or whatever it will only take a second.

Watch the bulges and inspect your brass. Don't use it more than 8 times or so is what they say. I inspect mine closely and get rid of it when something looks wrong. Off to the recyclers it goes.

If I can be of any help just let me know I will answer anything I can via the net sometimes it is more difficult that way though. I reload the following rounds if you have any questions about them. In no particular order:
Pistol
380acp
9mm
38spec
357mag
357sig
44mag
44spec
40s&w
10mm
50AE
45acp

Rifles:
223
308
338 lapua mag
50BMG
 
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PS If you decide to start reloading other calibers try to use only carbide dies. You don't have to lube most casings if you are using carbide.
 

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thank you for the info, sf! i wasn't aware of that part you mentioned about the cheaper powders filling up the case being safer (less likely to overcharge).
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
WOW SF!!! This is a GREAT post I'm sending you points!!! Printing this out too. Rob, anyway this can be made a "reloading sticky"?
 

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After reading these posts I feel more at easy about getting into reloading.

One question is there anything that I should just avoid or some tool/equipment that is just a plain waste of money?
 

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After reading these posts I feel more at easy about getting into reloading.

One question is there anything that I should just avoid or some tool/equipment that is just a plain waste of money?
What are you planning to re-load, and is there a particular tool you are concerned about? There are tools out there that I don't see the use for with me. However, in certain circles they are extremely useful and valueable. It depends on what your re-loading and what you want it (bullet) to do.
 

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I know this is what you call "Really late to the party" but just wanted to ask, now that it has been a while, How is the loading going?
Have you become addicted yet?
 
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