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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Is there an after-market part that can make the Glock 17 (Gen 3) slide a bit easier to rack? (The slide on my Sig P226, by comparison, is smooth as butter.) This is not only a comfort issue. It could also be a life-or-death issue, if someone were in a shootout, say, and needed to rack the slide, especially with sweat, blood, rain, seawater, or sand on the hands. Thanks for your help.
 

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Install a lighter weight recoil spring assembly. There are both captured and non captured aftermarket guide rods that will allow you to use a Wolfe reduced power recoil spring tuning kit. That will do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
EdF702. This is an excellent idea. Thanks. I checked the Wolff company website and YouTube video. I see the standard Glock spring is rated at 17 pounds. And the various replacement springs go as low as 10 pounds. But I wonder: At 10 pounds, would the pistol continue to function as well as before? Would there be any effect on ejection, etc.? Any thoughts on this?
 

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EdF702. This is a great idea. Thanks. I checked the Wolff company website and YouTube video. I see the standard Glock spring is rated at 17 pounds. And the various replacement springs go as low as 10 pounds. But I wonder: At 10 pounds, would the pistol continue to function as well as before? Would there be any effect on ejection, etc.? Any thoughts on this?
This is an interesting thread, I have never seen anyone ask this question although I'm sure it has occurred to some of us. And, true to form, EdF702 provided a quick, clear, and useful answer. Probably the only answer, come to think of it, assuming that the gun will be carried.

For a match gun, there is such a thing as a "slide racker", which is lever of sorts that attaches to a replacement slide cover plate. Here are two links, there are others: SLIDE RACKER for GLOCK® | Brownells, http://shop.springerprecision.com/product.sc?productId=205&categoryId=30

Thinking about comparing the slide resistance of a standard G17 with a Sig P226, I think that the heavier weight of the Sig (34 ounces to the Glock's 22 ounces) probably makes the slide easier to cycle, since most of the weight difference is in the frame. So, part of the difference you feel is due to the light weight of the Glock, which is one of the reasons people choose Glocks: they are easier to carry over a long period of time.

As for function, as long as you are using what I would call "target" or "plinking" ammunition, a light recoil spring will work fine. However, if you put a light recoil spring in the gun and then load it with some extra-hot +P defense ammunition, recoil will be very unpleasant. I don't know if additional wear to the gun would be caused by extended use of the light spring and hot ammo combination, but it's not something I would do with one of my Glocks.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Another good idea, Chris. And thanks for those links. Very informative. I was aware of the *circular* charging handle, but I like this one better.
 

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I "believe" that all Glocks use the same 17 pound spring weight for their RSA's (in different configurations of course, i.e. gen4, compacts etc) which is surprising considering the different slide forces between say a G17L and a G29.

That is one reason I'm gravitating away from gen4 models... Since I reload, I want to "explore" matching RSA weight to both caliber and loads. I understand the competition shooters have done this for a long time.

But, I don't think this is for "beginners" as it affects the gun's timing and could cause malfunctions.
 

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I would actually argue against installing lighter aftermarket springs, which may make the slide slightly easier to rack on YOUR firearm. What happens if you have to pickup another firearm and use it in self defense. What happens when you need to rack that slide? You cannot be screwed because instead of working on technique and building hand strength, you made YOUR firearm easier to operate.

Slingshot methods are actually very easy and only require the operator to be able to quickly stop a slide from moving forward by squeezing with basically your entire hand. I know that some females have an issue with this and people that may have issues with their hand like arthritis. It is also important to remember that a properly functioning weapon should lock back on empty. This means you only need to insert a fresh mag and drop the slide release to load another magazine full of rounds.
 

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I would actually argue against installing lighter aftermarket springs, which may make the slide slightly easier to rack on YOUR firearm. What happens if you have to pickup another firearm and use it in self defense. What happens when you need to rack that slide? You cannot be screwed because instead of working on technique and building hand strength, you made YOUR firearm easier to operate.
Heck of a good point. I skipped right past "practicality" and zoomed in on tinkering with the gun, again, when simple shooter improvement is probably a better answer.

Chris
 

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I would actually argue against installing lighter aftermarket springs, which may make the slide slightly easier to rack on YOUR firearm. What happens if you have to pickup another firearm and use it in self defense. What happens when you need to rack that slide? You cannot be screwed because instead of working on technique and building hand strength, you made YOUR firearm easier to operate.

Slingshot methods are actually very easy and only require the operator to be able to quickly stop a slide from moving forward by squeezing with basically your entire hand. I know that some females have an issue with this and people that may have issues with their hand like arthritis. It is also important to remember that a properly functioning weapon should lock back on empty. This means you only need to insert a fresh mag and drop the slide release to load another magazine full of rounds.
I totally agree. My wife had a problem with this but after a few weeks
of holding the slide "over the top" with the weak side hand and pushing
the grip forward with the strong side hand she has no issues with this now.
 

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I totally agree. My wife had a problem with this but after a few weeks
of holding the slide "over the top" with the weak side hand and pushing
the grip forward with the strong side hand she has no issues with this now.
This is usually the ticket!
 

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I totally agree. My wife had a problem with this but after a few weeks
of holding the slide "over the top" with the weak side hand and pushing
the grip forward with the strong side hand she has no issues with this now.
Perfect description. This is where many miss the slingshot method. They believe they have to hold the firearm steady with one hand while pulling back on the slide. It is actually the opposite. You are holding the slide, while pushing with your strong hand. After a bit of practice, you can push with one and pull with the other at the same time, which completes the slingshot method.
 

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When i got my gen3 19, my girlfriend could not rack it easily and had to do it off of her holster, which works, but is not ideal at a range. I bought some grip tape and put a strip down top of the slide from the ejection port to the rear sight and on the right hand side before and after the serrations. I did not put any on the left side because i thought that would tear up skin or clothes with extended carry, which is every weekend while we are camping.

Sent from my HTC One V using Tapatalk 2
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Update. I put some grip tape on my G17 gen3, and racking the slide is easier now. A simple solution.

Strangely, though, I went to a gunshop yesterday and handled the G21 gen3: racking THAT slide was downright easy. I was surprised, since I thought the recoil spring for a .45 would have to be much stronger than for a 9mm.
 

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Update. I put some grip tape on my G17 gen3, and racking the slide is easier now. A simple solution.

Strangely, though, I went to a gunshop yesterday and handled the G21 gen3: racking THAT slide was downright easy. I was surprised, since I thought the recoil spring for a .45 would have to be much stronger than for a 9mm.
How many rounds do have through this gun? New guns can be a little stiff but after more and more rounds they will loosen up. When I first read your post my first thought was grip tape, so I think you found the right solution. Also the power stroke method (hand over the top) is the proper technique and should allow you apply maximum force.
 

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Glocks in 9mm are in my opinion over sprung. They use that 17 lb. spring for just about every caliber. You can go down at least to a 15 lb with no problems. Some where there is a post by I think by Duanne Thomas who has shot thousands of +p rounds with a thirteen lb spring with no wear whatsoever. Most uspsa shooters run 13 or 14 lb springs. Try running that 17 lb spring shooting strong and weak hand and see if your gun don't jam.
 

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Is there an after-market part that can make the Glock 17 (Gen 3) slide a bit easier to rack? (The slide on my Sig P226, by comparison, is smooth as butter.) This is not only a comfort issue. It could also be a life-or-death issue, if someone were in a shootout, say, and needed to rack the slide, especially with sweat, blood, rain, seawater, or sand on the hands. Thanks for your help.
what I do is use the palming method *grabbing the top of the slide with your weak hand and rack the slide*
I find it much easier than using my thumb and pointer finger which I never do, once you keep doing the palming method it will be second nature and you will be able to rack it quicker and without failing to rack the first time. I always had to retry again and again until I starting palming the rack. I hope this makes sense to you:)
 

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what I do is use the palming method *grabbing the top of the slide with your weak hand and rack the slide*
Is there any other way? ;)

I'm with you, enough training with that method and I can't even bring myself to slingshot a pistol even if I wanted to.
 

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Have you ever thought of racking the slide open and just leave it opened for a couple of weeks ? I know this will help a 1911 when the spring is a little to stiff. I think this would be the first thing I would try.
 

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Just a small note...

If you put your hand over the top of the slide when you rack it, make sure you do not put your hand over the ejector opening... Seldom, but occasionally, a round will pull pack off center and hit the ejector... that will fire the round and... well... it would be bad to have your hand over it...

The best tip is to hold the slide from the back... On the grip grooves... Then pull back on the slide while pushing forward on the frame with your strong hand... That makes racking a slide much easier...
 
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