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I'm currently reading "The Glock in Competition" second edition by Robin Taylor with Bobby Carver, and Mark Passamanek.

It's an interesting book. It goes through some of the history of Glock pistols used for competition... Some tips for weak points on Glocks... What spares to take to a match... how to shoot several kinds of matches... and winds up with stories of past champions: Armando Valdes, David Sevigny, Julie Goloski, and Carina Burns.

The chapter about GSSF Competition (written by Bobby Carver) has two interesting paragraphs about mastering the Glock trigger. I'll reprint them here:

Bobby Carver said:
One of the easiest techniques to master that will make the quickest improvement in how well you can compete with a Glock is learning how to "master" its trigger.

The secret to shooting a quick and smooth repeat shot from any Glock is to keep your trigger finger held back, relaxing it only enough to let the striker reset. People call this "riding" the trigger. Only releasing it this short distance (about one-tenth inch) eliminates the need to release the trigger to its farthest position forward (a distance of about one-half inch). This procedure reduces the amount of trigger movement, thus allowing quicker and smoother shots.
I was watching Shooting USA last week and Phil Strader gave a short video tip on "Grip and Trigger Control."

http://www.shootingusa.com/PRO_TIPS/STRADER1-5/strader1-5.html

They don't seem to have a copy of the video posted on the web, but there's a write-up in the link.

I thought this was interesting. Maybe this is how some of those guys shoot so fast. I posted this here in the competition section because it's probably not a good technique for everyday shooting. I guess I'm just curious what you guys think.
 

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Yup, you should do this with all safe-action, SAO, and TDA type triggers. You just let them out enough to reset (sear engaging).

There is one of the big time shooters (name escapes me at the moment) that teaches otherwise, but he is the only one.
 

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Interesting stuff there jb. Thanks.
 

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Yup, you should do this with all safe-action, SAO, and TDA type triggers. You just let them out enough to reset (sear engaging).

There is one of the big time shooters (name escapes me at the moment) that teaches otherwise, but he is the only one.
It sounded interesting, I just wasn't sure it was a good practice...

Thanks for the verification, jl...
 

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ya and it dosent hurt to have an extremely light trigger. i felt the trigger on a guys G34 i think it was... so ridiculous how light it was.. and he runs production class with me in USPSA with it.

i also was able to shoot another competitors ammo through my G23 that he loads himself. it was about half the recoil. that makes noticing things like trigger reset alot easier.

but these are all things that are purely for the game. i wouldnt reccomend a crazy light trigger in a carry gun or half power ammo.
 

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ya and it dosent hurt to have an extremely light trigger. i felt the trigger on a guys G34 i think it was... so ridiculous how light it was.. and he runs production class with me in USPSA with it.

i also was able to shoot another competitors ammo through my G23 that he loads himself. it was about half the recoil. that makes noticing things like trigger reset alot easier.

but these are all things that are purely for the game. i wouldnt reccomend a crazy light trigger in a carry gun or half power ammo.
Smoothness of the pull and crispness/cleaness of the break are MUCH more important than lightness. Lightness can lead to its own problems.
 

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Smoothness of the pull and crispness/cleaness of the break are MUCH more important than lightness. Lightness can lead to its own problems.
agreed. but your kinda splitting hairs by taking smoothness and lightness into two categories. if its lighter it will require less effort from your finger intern making it feel smoother. but i know what you mean.
 

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agreed. but your kinda splitting hairs by taking smoothness and lightness into two categories. if its lighter it will require less effort from your finger intern making it feel smoother. but i know what you mean.
Not at all. Ever shoot DA revolvers? The trigger isn't light in the least (12lbs), but you can tell a big difference between one that is smooth and one that isn't.

Smoothness and lightness are two completely different characteristics.
 

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The "short or quick reset" on the Glock triggers is one of the things that keeps me one of their biggest fans. Rapidly firing multiple shots using the short reset trigger greatly enhances target acquisition, speed and accuracy.

PS: you'd be amazed how many Glock owners don't even know the quick reset trigger exists!! Mention it to other Glock shooters at a range and you'll see what I mean.
 

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The "short or quick reset" on the Glock triggers is one of the things that keeps me one of their biggest fans. Rapidly firing multiple shots using the short reset trigger greatly enhances target acquisition, speed and accuracy.
Agree, it is one of the things that will make me keep my 19/3 and look for more Glocks in the future.
 

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Not at all. Ever shoot DA revolvers? The trigger isn't light in the least (12lbs), but you can tell a big difference between one that is smooth and one that isn't.

Smoothness and lightness are two completely different characteristics.
Totally agree with jl. To me, a smooth trigger means that you would put a constant -- and unvarying -- amount of pressure to move the trigger through the break.

Here's a theoretical trigger-- let's say it has a 10 lb pull. An ultra-smooth trigger means you only have to put a tiny amount of extra pressure -- 10 lbs and 1 oz -- to make it move through the break. In reality, the pressure still will vary a bit

For people who like numbers and graphs, there's a cool example of a pressure plot here: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/training/firearms-training/module07/fir_m07_t05_05.htm

Again I agree with jl, you can have a smooth trigger that's heavy (i'm thinking the Sig p226 during a DA shot), or a lighter trigger that's not really smooth. To me that would be a Glock, especially if you're going through the whole 0.5 inches of travel. Not putting the pistol down -- I love my G17. It's just that there are definitely pistols with smoother trigger pulls.
 

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Not at all. Ever shoot DA revolvers? The trigger isn't light in the least (12lbs), but you can tell a big difference between one that is smooth and one that isn't.

Smoothness and lightness are two completely different characteristics.
yeah ive shot my share of revolvers but i try not to pick up any bad habbits so i limit my contact lol
 

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I tell people all the time to "ride" the trigger on a Glock
 

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Totally agree with jl. To me, a smooth trigger means that you would put a constant -- and unvarying -- amount of pressure to move the trigger through the break.

Here's a theoretical trigger-- let's say it has a 10 lb pull. An ultra-smooth trigger means you only have to put a tiny amount of extra pressure -- 10 lbs and 1 oz -- to make it move through the break. In reality, the pressure still will vary a bit

For people who like numbers and graphs, there's a cool example of a pressure plot here: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/training/firearms-training/module07/fir_m07_t05_05.htm

Again I agree with jl, you can have a smooth trigger that's heavy (i'm thinking the Sig p226 during a DA shot), or a lighter trigger that's not really smooth. To me that would be a Glock, especially if you're going through the whole 0.5 inches of travel. Not putting the pistol down -- I love my G17. It's just that there are definitely pistols with smoother trigger pulls.
no i agree totally aswell... but a super light trigger 2.5lbs thats rough and a 2.5lb trigger thats smooth is gonna be irrelivant especially to some one whos shot mostly heavy triggers. it going to feel like the smoothest trigger ever. like when i went from the XD to the Glock... i was like omg this things trigger is so light!...but once you become more use to it it starts to feel normal. you just have to develop the muscle memory for the trigger.
 

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One of the things I dislike about my Sig P250, is the really long trigger pull, much like a revolver.
But it is also what I do like about my Sig P250, it lets me practices a smooth and consistent trigger pull and I find my that I am shooting better after I keep practicing at home.
 

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If I'm not mistaken the name is Rob Leatham.
I can't remember if it was Leatham or not. it may well have been.

His theory was that it was more consistent when swapping from gun to gun in different competition divisions. If it was Leatham, it's hard to argue with his success, but it certainly isn't the prevailing wisdom.
 

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No better way to learn trigger control than to shoot DA revolvers...
theoretically speaking. but as my little signature thing states. "Fear the man with only one gun" the thinking behind that is if you only use one gun you arent getting use to all these different guns. so if you only shoot the same gun all the time you will be better with it then if you shoot several different guns. even if you still had the same amount of time on your carry gun.

although i contridict myself because i also think one should be capable with any gun. so like i said i limit my contact to other guns. especially ones with 12lb trigger pulls and no magazine.
 
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