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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am enjoying my new g34 4th gen but would like a little lighter trigger pull but not at the cost of reliability. It came with a "minus" connector and I have polished the appropriate parts.

I read an earlier post a while back that I think said that putting in a lighter (wolf) safety plunger spring and a heavier (wolf) trigger spring will shave off a pound from the pull keeping the stock striker spring.

Am I remembering wrong? It seems counter intuitive that a heavier trigger spring would result in a lighter pull?


I have searched at length for the earlier post and can't find it.

thanks

Bruno
 

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I am enjoying my new g34 4th gen but would like a little lighter trigger pull but not at the cost of reliability. It came with a "minus" connector and I have polished the appropriate parts.

I read an earlier post a while back that I think said that putting in a lighter (wolf) safety plunger spring and a heavier (wolf) trigger spring will shave off a pound from the pull keeping the stock striker spring.

Am I remembering wrong? It seems counter intuitive that a heavier trigger spring would result in a lighter pull?

I have searched at length for the earlier post and can't find it.

thanks

Bruno
Welcome aboard!

The lighter firing pin safety spring will smooth out the pull by removing a hesitation as the trigger bar pushes up the firing pin safety, but it won't reduce the pull. Similarly, the heavier trigger spring has an effect on the feel of the pull as the trigger breaks, but I have never been able to measure a difference in pull.

Take a look at this animation, you should be able to see how a heavier trigger spring has the effect:Glock Pistol Animation

If that doesn't make sense to you, please reply again to this post and I'll try to explain it further. I'm off to the range now, will be back this evening.

Chris
 

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I am enjoying my new g34 4th gen but would like a little lighter trigger pull but not at the cost of reliability. It came with a "minus" connector and I have polished the appropriate parts.

I read an earlier post a while back that I think said that putting in a lighter (wolf) safety plunger spring and a heavier (wolf) trigger spring will shave off a pound from the pull keeping the stock striker spring.

Am I remembering wrong? It seems counter intuitive that a heavier trigger spring would result in a lighter pull?

One way to get a lighter trigger pull on a Gen 4 is to put a Gen 3 trigger bar in the gun. The Gen 4 trigger bar has a bump on the piece that raises the firing pin safety up. The bump also rubs on the slide during the trigger pull causing a heavier trigger pull. The Gen 3 trigger bar does not have the bump. If you haven't already polish all the contact points on the trigger bar and the firing pin safety plunger this will help out on the weight of the trigger pull.

A lighter weight striker spring will lighten the trigger pull but sometimes will not fire some primers if they are harder primers.

I have a Gen 3 trigger bar in my Gen 4 model 19 and it works fine and lightened up the trigger pull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you Mr. Cohland. The animation helps quite a bit understanding the interaction between the components.

I do have a couple more questions:

1) How does the heavier spring effect the trigger feel?

2) It is way to improve the trigger weight or feel you would recomendthat would still allow the gun to digest the mixed quality ammo available these days

3) Or should I change the plunger spring and just run more rounds through the gun to get used to it? ( I only have arround 500 through it)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I did do the 25 cent polish after my first trip to the range. I will order a 3rd gen trigger bar and try that too, they don't appear to be very costly and like spring changes is easily reversable.

thanks

Bruno
 

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Stay tuned for a little while, please. I just ran a series of tests comparing the new trigger bar with the older one mentioned by bubba68, I will post the results within 30 minutes or so.

Chris
 

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Thank you Mr. Cohland. The animation helps quite a bit understanding the interaction between the components.

I do have a couple more questions:

1) How does the heavier spring effect the trigger feel?

2) It is way to improve the trigger weight or feel you would recomendthat would still allow the gun to digest the mixed quality ammo available these days

3) Or should I change the plunger spring and just run more rounds through the gun to get used to it? ( I only have arround 500 through it)
First, please call me Chris.

1) I think (and this is only a guess) that when the spring pulls the trigger bar up after the shot has broken, it makes the trigger pull feel complete quicker.

2) It doesn't hurt anything to change the trigger spring, and it's cheap. I don't bother with them any more, but you might feel a difference, so I would go ahead and make the change.

3) To a point, Glocks do improve with age. But after about 300-500 rounds I would consider the gun to be broken in. Others may differ. Also, please look at this excellent thread started by boomer for some good information

http://glock.pro/glock-tech-warranty/1699-advanced-glock-trigger-tuning-2.html#post19636

Chris
 

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...One way to get a lighter trigger pull on a Gen 4 is to put a Gen 3 trigger bar in the gun. The Gen 4 trigger bar has a bump on the piece that raises the firing pin safety up. The bump also rubs on the slide during the trigger pull causing a heavier trigger pull. The Gen 3 trigger bar does not have the bump.........I have a Gen 3 trigger bar in my Gen 4 model 19 and it works fine and lightened up the trigger pull.
I have heard the statement that the older trigger bar, without the "bump" (see photo) is better, and will reduce trigger pull. It's tempting to believe that the bump would introduce some friction which could possibly increase trigger pull weight, but I've always wondered if that assertion is true.

Hand Gesture Finger Bicycle part Wrist


As it turns out, I happen to have a brand new Gen4 G34, and I have an extra old-style trigger bar (also brand new), so I decided to put the question to a test.

1) The G34 had the original ("Gen4") trigger bar, Part Number 3608, which I had polished.
2) I ran twenty trigger pulls and measured them, as done in the thread on the Connector Comparison Test.
3) I then removed the 3608 trigger bar, polished a brand new 357 ("Gen3") trigger bar, and installed it in the G34.
4) I ran twenty trigger pulls and measured them as I did in step 2.

Here are the results:

Original Gen4 Trigger Bar, P/N 3608:
Average trigger pull: 84.97 ounces, or 5 pounds 4.97 ounces.

Replacement Trigger Bar, P/N 357:
Average trigger pull: 89.1 ounces, or 5 pounds 9.1 ounces.

My conclusion is that the "Gen3" 357 trigger bar will not reduce the trigger pull of the Gen4 G34. It will instead increase the trigger pull by about 4 ounces. Sorry to be contrary, but I really believe that testing and gathering some data is a valuable way to sort out the myths from the facts when we are talking about various means of improving Glock triggers.

Since I did not perform these tests on the same gun you have (a G19), and since the G19 uses a different trigger bar in the Gen3 version, it's possible that we would have different results with that gun. That said, I'm pretty certain about the results achieved on the Gen4 G34.

Here's the Data:

3608357
PoundsOuncesTotal OuncesPoundsOuncesTotal Ounces
558558.588.5
58.588.55585
52.582.55282
57.587.557.587.5
558551090
4157956.586.5
50.580.551292
415.979.95989
58.588.55989
5383510.590.5
52825989
54845484
52.582.55787
53.583.5512.592.5
548457.587.5
58.588.5512.592.5
58.588.55686
58.588.5512.592.5
515955888
53.583.567103
Avg84.97Avg89.1
Median84Median88.75
StdDev3.850782559StdDev4.351648206

Chris
 

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I have heard the statement that the older trigger bar, without the "bump" (see photo) is better, and will reduce trigger pull. It's tempting to believe that the bump would introduce some friction which could possibly increase trigger pull weight, but I've always wondered if that assertion is true.

View attachment 5146

As it turns out, I happen to have a brand new Gen4 G34, and I have an extra old-style trigger bar (also brand new), so I decided to put the question to a test.

1) The G34 had the original ("Gen4") trigger bar, Part Number 3608, which I had polished.
2) I ran twenty trigger pulls and measured them, as done in the thread on the Connector Comparison Test.
3) I then removed the 3608 trigger bar, polished a brand new 357 ("Gen3") trigger bar, and installed it in the G34.
4) I ran twenty trigger pulls and measured them as I did in step 2.

Here are the results:

Original Gen4 Trigger Bar, P/N 3608:
Average trigger pull: 84.97 ounces, or 5 pounds 4.97 ounces.

Replacement Trigger Bar, P/N 357:
Average trigger pull: 89.1 ounces, or 5 pounds 9.1 ounces.

My conclusion is that the "Gen3" 357 trigger bar will not reduce the trigger pull of the Gen4 G34. It will instead increase the trigger pull by about 4 ounces. Sorry to be contrary, but I really believe that testing and gathering some data is a valuable way to sort out the myths from the facts when we are talking about various means of improving Glock triggers.

Since I did not perform these tests on the same gun you have (a G19), and since the G19 uses a different trigger bar in the Gen3 version, it's possible that we would have different results with that gun. That said, I'm pretty certain about the results achieved on the Gen4 G34.

Here's the Data:

3608357
PoundsOuncesTotal OuncesPoundsOuncesTotal Ounces
558558.588.5
58.588.55585
52.582.55282
57.587.557.587.5
558551090
4157956.586.5
50.580.551292
415.979.95989
58.588.55989
5383510.590.5
52825989
54845484
52.582.55787
53.583.5512.592.5
548457.587.5
58.588.5512.592.5
58.588.55686
58.588.5512.592.5
515955888
53.583.567103
Avg84.97Avg89.1
Median84Median88.75
StdDev3.850782559StdDev4.351648206

Chris
You Da Man Chris. Must have taken you a while to do all the tests. I don't have a trigger gauge yet I need to get me one instead of relying on my calibrated trigger finger.

Do you work on other brand of guns or mainly on Glocks?
 

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You Da Man Chris. Must have taken you a while to do all the tests. I don't have a trigger gauge yet I need to get me one instead of relying on my calibrated trigger finger.

Do you work on other brand of guns or mainly on Glocks?
Thanks, I'll take that as a compliment!

A trigger gauge can be your friend, but it cannot measure the subjective things like smoothness or a crisp let-off. Your finger will always be better for those measurements, believe me.

I have a few other brands of guns, but the only thing I've ever been trained on is Glocks. My learning method with other guns (1911s, Ruger Single-Action revolvers, CZ75s, AR15s) is to try something, screw it up half the time, buy parts to fix it, and repeat the cycle until I have figured out how to solve the problem that I probably created in the first place...

Chris
 

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Chris,

Since you seem to be the great grand Guru of Gluck's on the forum I have a question for you.

Do you know anyway to eliminate or greatly reduce the pre travel on the Glock triggers? I have seen some trigger housings that use setscrews to reduce the pre travel and over travel but do you know of any other way to reduce the pre travel?

Let me know.

Thanks
 

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Chris,

Since you seem to be the great grand Guru of Gluck's on the forum I have a question for you.

Do you know anyway to eliminate or greatly reduce the pre travel on the Glock triggers? I have seen some trigger housings that use setscrews to reduce the pre travel and over travel but do you know of any other way to reduce the pre travel?

Let me know.

Thanks
Bubba68,

You are too kind. Please believe me when I say that there are a lot of folks on this forum who know more than I do about Glocks, the only difference is that I can type faster than some of them!

I know of one certain way to reduce pre-travel, and that is to buy a trigger kit with the trigger pinned. Here is one: The "EDGE" Competition Trigger System - GlockTriggers.com

NOTE CAREFULLY that there is a version for Gen3 and Gen4. I have this kit installed in a G35 and it works perfectly, there's almost no pre-travel.

Chris
 

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Bubba68,

You are too kind. Please believe me when I say that there are a lot of folks on this forum who know more than I do about Glocks, the only difference is that I can type faster than some of them!

I know of one certain way to reduce pre-travel, and that is to buy a trigger kit with the trigger pinned. Here is one: The "EDGE" Competition Trigger System - GlockTriggers.com

NOTE CAREFULLY that there is a version for Gen3 and Gen4. I have this kit installed in a G35 and it works perfectly, there's almost no pre-travel.

Chris
Thanks for the trigger info I will check it out. There is a small gun show here in Columbus this weekend there are usually a couple of Glock Smiths their I will check them out to see what they have in the way of trigger upgrades.
 

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