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I missed it what did he do with his shoulder?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the motion needed to rack the slide comes from both the shoulder muscles and elbow. exact names escape me but at least rotator cuff, lats, and biceps are involved.

I should've said I wish i had muscles like that guy :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the motion needed to rack the slide comes at least both the shoulder muscles and elbow. exact names escape me but at least rotator cuff, lats, and biceps are involved.

I should've said I wish i had muscles like that shooter :)
 

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I understand now. He is also using a very low powered recoil spring to be able to do this. It wouldn't work with a 15-17lbs spring. The spring is just barely strong enough to return the gun to battery. Only then if everything goes just right.
 

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I see!
 

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Other than it looking cool, what is the practical application for this? I don't have my mags lying around, in the standing up position, on a hard surface, ready for me to load in my firearms one handed. From the competition standpoint, how many seconds did he save my doing this rather than using two hands? 1, maybe 2 seconds?
 

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Other than it looking cool, what is the practical application for this? I don't have my mags lying around, in the standing up position, on a hard surface, ready for me to load in my firearms one handed. From the competition standpoint, how many seconds did he save my doing this rather than using two hands? 1, maybe 2 seconds?
I guess someone could dream up something. It still isn't anything I plan on converting a pistol to be able to do though.
 

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I think one of the main reason for doing this type of shooting, is to shoot on the move. At the range, most shoot standing in one spot, but if something where to happen in real life, chances are you would have to move and shoot or shoot at a moving target.
 

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I still don't see how he was able to rack the slide like that... even with weak reloads, it seems like the recoil spring would have to be very, very weak...
 

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I still don't see how he was able to rack the slide like that... even with weak reloads, it seems like the recoil spring would have to be very, very weak...
Reloads have nothing to do with it. It is all in the recoil spring. I didn't know that they were even available in the states. I know the are popular in some other countries. I would almost guess it is something he made using a non-captured spring and rod. It would be a easy build just not something I would be interested in
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Other than it looking cool, what is the practical application for this?..From the competition standpoint, how many seconds did he save my doing this rather than using two hands? 1, maybe 2 seconds?
I agree, there's no practical advantage to this. From a competition standpoint, the time saved might make the difference between winning in your division and getting second place. Some of the high performance competitors (which I'm not) will measure their performance gains in fractions of a second.
 

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I agree, there's no practical advantage to this. From a competition standpoint, the time saved might make the difference between winning in your division and getting second place. Some of the high performance competitors (which I'm not) will measure their performance gains in fractions of a second.
LOL. Maybe that's why I haven't been winning any matches. (Inside joke with Vol and JL).
 

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Other than it looking cool, what is the practical application for this? I don't have my mags lying around, in the standing up position, on a hard surface, ready for me to load in my firearms one handed. From the competition standpoint, how many seconds did he save my doing this rather than using two hands? 1, maybe 2 seconds?
You're right, it's hard to imagine a practical application, but USPSA stage procedures require creativity to be competitive, and this guy certainly was creative, making the most of his strength, agility, and (I hope) a weak recoil spring. I shoot a G34 with a 13-pound spring and I can just barely get the slide to begin to move back, using all of my (limited) power, when I try to mimic what this shooter was able to do.

In this game, at the level that this guy must be playing, fractions of a second do count. I scanned the times of the first and second place finishers in all six stages in a recent match, and the difference was about a half second on most of them. Speed is really important in USPSA!

At my level, I just try to be safe, to engage all the targets, to score points on the targets, and to move quickly enough not be embarrassed. In a recent match, I scored the highest number of points (hits on the targets, not counting the time) on two of six stages, and I still ended up 24th out of 31 shooters overall, because I'm not fast enough. Needless to say, I've got a long way to go, but the challenge is fun.

Chris
 
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