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Congrats on your purchase. You'll find you can do some really cool things with a macro lens. Buying a new lens is almost as exciting as buying a new gun as far as I'm concerned. Almost ;)
Thanks for steering me towards one.... I am looking forward to the learning curve.
 

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If you're interested in camera settings for photographs posted on the Internet... and you use Firefox for your browser... try an extension named FxIF... It shows all the EXIF properties with a right click of the mouse...

 

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Discussion Starter · #44 · (Edited)
Here are a few photos of the lock of an 1864 Springfield Rifle Musket, part of a gun I used to shoot in the N-SSA. I could get off 3 aimed shots a minute with good consistency and accuracy, even out to 100 yards with this rifle.

What I am quickly learning is that even beginning to do this barely well enough to get good results, you really have to pay attention to a number of things: camera settings, lighting, (auto) focus, depth of field, and then you'e got to process the thing with software. Now I understand why Point And Shoot cameras are so popular!

Lock Exterior.jpg

Focal Length: 32
Aperture: f/10
Shutter Speed: 1 Sec.
ISO: 100
Light: Cloudy daylight with a desk lamp I forgot to turn off

Lock Interior.jpg

Focal Length: 26
Aperture: f/13
Shutter Speed: 1 Sec.
ISO: 100
Light: Cloudy daylight with that desk lamp again

Lock on Page.jpg

Focal Length: 40
Aperture: f/9
Shutter Speed: 1/6 Sec.
ISO: 100
Light: Cloudy daylight with that desk lamp again

Chris
 

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If you're interested in camera settings for photographs posted on the Internet... and you use Firefox for your browser... try an extension named FxIF... It shows all the EXIF properties with a right click of the mouse...

Thanks _jb.... That's a great tool! Saves us all a bit of typing as well!
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Thanks _jb.... That's a great tool! Saves us all a bit of typing as well!
+1, and it makes it a lot less likely that I'll make a mistake copying the information.

Chris
 

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Not as old as Cohland's masterpiece, but this one is 90 years old and shoots fantastic..... Looks pretty good too, IMHO...

IMG_0365.jpg

IMG_0366.jpg

IMG_0369.jpg

IMG_0372.jpg

IMG_0373.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Not as old as Cohland's masterpiece, but this one is 90 years old and shoots fantastic..... Looks pretty good too, IMHO...
Ed,

Where are you finding these beautiful DA revolvers? There's nothing like this showing up in any of the gun shops around here, and I've been looking. I'd love to have a WWII vintage (US) revolver, but so far, nothing.

Chris
 

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Ed,

Where are you finding these beautiful DA revolvers? There's nothing like this showing up in any of the gun shops around here, and I've been looking. I'd love to have a WWII vintage (US) revolver, but so far, nothing.

Chris
With the rush to buy all things semi auto related, there has actually been some old revolvers put back in circulation as trades. I was able to grab a couple of "wheelies" and some friends have got some good deals on nice guns.
 

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Got the new lens....

IMG_0376.jpg

IMG_0377.jpg

IMG_0379.jpg

IMG_0381.jpg
 

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Excellent!

Having the right equipment always helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Excellent!..Having the right equipment always helps!
Ed,

+1, the clarity of those photos is really excellent. Just for the heck of it, I took similar photos of my G21SF using a point-and-shoot camera, a Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS20, that has a Leica lens and a "macro" setting. As good as I thought this camera had been (until now) the clarity did not approach what you got with that Macro lens. Not even close.

Thanks for the examples of excellence!

Chris
 

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ED - You have some dust on your rear site you need to take care of.. :) Great pics!
 

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ED - You have some dust on your rear site you need to take care of.. :) Great pics!
I couldn't see it until I "developed" the pic!
 
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Great pics Ed!
 

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I don't own any wheel guns, but here is a photo of my wife's Ruger LCR.
There is probably some dust on it because I don't clean this gun!

DSC02784.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 · (Edited)
A member asked me to offer some tips on gun photography, so I put this quick post together.

First, I am not an expert on this area, I just have learned, through trial and error, what to use within a fairly narrow envelope for shooting photos of handguns and small objects. We do have other members who are photographers, with an education in the art, and they can answer detailed questions. NYY23 and EdF702 are two people who fall into the category of experts, in my view. NYY23 is a professional, EdF702 is highly skilled, although I don't know that he is a professional photographer.

To take pictures of guns, I use one of two digital cameras:

1. Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS20. Sometimes CostCo has these, but I got mine through B&H Photo. This is the camera I use for most handheld shots, where flash will work OK.

2. Nikon D80. This is the camera I use for most tripod shots, where I will be using natural light and very slow shutter speed. This camera will record in RAW mode, which allows more control of the finished image.

Features I look for in a camera are:

· Self-timer, which allows you to push a button that starts a timer, say 10 seconds, after which the shutter is tripped. This is critical for long-exposure shots where you are using natural light.
· High-quality lens to allow good clear close-ups.
. Ability to use Aperture priority to get long exposure shots.
· Ability to record images stored in the camera in RAW mode, which allows you to use advanced software to refine the final image.
· Ability to use standard memory cards, that you can buy at CostCo.
· Auto-focus is required.
· Close-up feature, sometimes called “Macro” is necessary.
· A remote control is a really nice way to control the shutter. I don’t have one for the Lumix, but I do for the Nikon.

While the camera is important, two other factors need attention as well: managing the scene and lighting, and the software you use to produce the final image.

For me, managing the scene and lighting are accomplished pretty simply. I use a small stool as a platform, upon which I put a white dishtowel (most recently), and over that I put a plate of thick, tempered, frosted non-glare glass, about 12” x 18”, with beveled edges to protect your hands. I had to go to a glass store to get the plate cut, but it was worth the effort. The plate gives the photos depth and controls glare: the objects seem to float in space, which is the effect I wanted.

I put the camera in a tripod most of the time (even the Lumix) and use the timer delay feature or a remote control to allow me to trip the shutter without touching the camera, so that the image isn’t blurred on a long-exposure shot.

My “technique” is pretty simple, here’s a quick list of the steps I follow to take a photo of a handgun:

1. Make the gun safe! Remove the magazine and make sure the chamber is clear. Leave an empty magazine in the gun, because they usually look a little weird without one.
2. Wipe the gun clean, with a lint-free cloth if you have one. Digital cameras can pick up the tiniest specks of lint and really distract the viewer.
3. Set up the stool, towel, and glass plate near a window so that I can get some natural light.
4. Put the gun on the plate.
5. Set up the camera in the tripod, positioning the camera directly over the gun as much as possible, and as close as you can while making sure that it’s not too close for auto focus, and that you can get the whole gun in the frame of the picture.
6. Using Aperture priority, set the camera up for something like f/14-22, whatever the camera is capable of: a really tight aperture that will give you a lot of depth of field, but which will require a very long exposure (hence the tripod).
7. Pre-focus to make sure that you’ve got the gun in the frame.
8. Trip the self-timer and step back so that your shadow doesn’t affect the light (ask me how I know…)
9. When the shutter trips, you’re done with that photo.
10. Take a series of photos with different apertures (bracketing) to see what difference it makes. I probably waste a lot of time doing this, but I’m still learning and am never really certain of the outcome until I see the photos on the screen.

Software is critical. In my case, I’m a Mac user so my primary software is iPhoto, which allows me to do the things I need to do for every gun photo I take:

. Straighten the photo
· Crop the photo
· Adjust the exposure
· Remove background shadows
· Suppress glare (highlights)
· Adjust the color “temperature” and tint
· Export the photo to a .jpg image that’s not too large, I usually try for about a 500kb maximum.

I also have Adobe Photoshop Elements, but it’s a lot more complicated and I am still learning how to use it…probably will be for life. Most cameras come with some kind of software, which you may find perfectly adequate.

Again, this is "what I do" and not necessarily the best way to do the job.

Chris
 
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Great post Chris. I wonder how the frosted glass would work in a light box? Any idea?
 
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