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This review became really long so, I'm going to start with my recommendation first:

I've been using the Glok-E-Trainer on a G34 for about a week now and was really struggling to figure out what I would write in this review. I was learning from the E-Trainer with certain drills but the feel of the trigger is very different. Then I installed a NY2 spring (https://www.gtdist.com/products/glock-trigger-springs-for-new-york.html) and tried the E-Trainer - BINGO! Adding the NY2 with the E-Trainer resulted in a pretty close trigger pull with an average pull weight of 5.2lbs!

I absolutely recommend the Glok-E-Trainer (glok-E-trainer) when used with a Glock NY2 trigger spring. At $24 for the Glok-E-Trainer and $2 for the NY2, it's hard to find a better value for improving your skills. I still believe the SIRT with L.A.S.R. software is the best training system available but at $400+ for the top model, it's not an option everyone can afford.

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Review:
Dry fire practice is, in my opinion, an absolute necessity for those who wish to become truly competent with a firearm or even just comfortable - i.e. the first time you draw a gun from a holster and pull the trigger should not be with live ammo! The two most important aspects of marksmanship are sight picture and trigger control. Dry fire practice gives the opportunity to observe and perfect trigger control in a far more cost effective manner than only using live fire to train.

The down side of trying to do dry fire practice with a Glock is that the slide must be cycled after each pull of the trigger. This limits some forms of dry fire training and makes the process a bit tedious. The Glok-E-Trainer is designed to allow continuous trigger pulls without cycling the slide.

How it works:
To understand how the Glok-E-Trainer works one needs a basic understanding of how a Glock fires, specifically the drop safety. In short (very short) the trigger bar on a Glock will not drop down and release the firing pin unless it engages the connector which forces it down. If you're not familiar with this, here are a couple of videos demonstrating it. The first video shows the interaction between the trigger bar and connector, the second shows the opposite side of the gun.


When the trigger bar has dropped, a wedge on the inside of the slide pushes the connector over during the slide cycle, releasing the bar so the trigger spring can pull it back up to engage the firing pin lug again.

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The Glok-E-Trainer extends this wedge which keeps the connector pushed away from the trigger bar. This prevents the trigger bar from dropping down and releasing the firing pin.

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One of the ingenious parts of the E-Trainer is that it installs and uninstalls without removing the slide. That's important because if the trigger bar and firing pin lug don't disengage the slide cannot be removed.

Cost:
It was the cost of the Glok-E-Trainer that initially caught my attention. At $24 it's significantly less than the alternative resetting trigger options for dry fire training with Glocks. Costing about the same as two boxes of 9mm range ammo, it's almost a no-brainer. If not having to cycle the slide will motivate someone to get more trigger pulls, they will, over time, improve their shooting skills way more than two boxes of ammo will.

There are two alternatives for dry fire training that do not require cycling a slide that I have experience with:
1. Resetting triggers such as the one from GlockStore (Reset Trigger Kit for Glock) typically cost around $200
2. A training pistol such as the SIRT (Home Page) which start at $239 and go up to over $400 depending on features.

Limitations:
Obviously, without the engagement of the connector the trigger pull is going to be different. There will not be the typical "wall" felt with a Glock or the break when the firing pin releases. With the standard trigger spring in place the only resistance is the firing pin spring and the trigger spring is working against it. The standard Glock trigger pull is intended to be 5.5lbs. My testing of the trigger pull with the Glok-E-Trainer had an average pull weight of 3lbs 11oz - significantly less than the standard Glock trigger.

I did some standard dry fire drills like the coin drill (balance a coin on the front sight) and even with the significantly lighter/different pull, I was able to see movement and tweak my grip to correct it. This was a pleasant surprise and indicated that without any changes there was value to the E-Trainer.

I then performed some holster draw/fire drills. I honestly didn't think the trigger weight would matter with these drills but I found that for me it did. The feel of the trigger was just too light/different for me to stay engaged with the drill and feel like I was learning.

Solution:
The limitations left me unsure how to review the E-Trainer. On one hand, the price is right and it had proven to be able to improve trigger control with some drills. On the other hand the feel of the trigger is dramatically different than a standard Glock. Then the idea of testing it with the NY1 and NY2 trigger springs hit me. The NY springs work very different than the standard trigger spring. Where the standard spring actually pulls the trigger bar rearwards the NY springs push up on the bar and increase the amount of force required to pull the trigger. With a standard connector, the NY1 increases the trigger pull to 8lbs and the NY2 increases it to a whopping 11lbs!

Unfortunately, I've misplaced my NY1 trigger spring. I'll update this review if I find it. However, the NY2 appears to be the perfect match. With the E-Trainer in place using the NY2 trigger spring, the weight averaged a near perfect 5.2lbs. While there is still not a wall and break, the added weight brings the feel of the trigger much closer to standard. The key difference is the 5lbs is throughout the pull (start to finish) where it would normally be only the 2nd half of the pull. This is actually not a bad tradeoff as I believe it will help improve trigger discipline throughout the entire pull. When I went back to the holster drills it was a far more realistic experience.

Comparisons:
I'll just get it out of the way that I am and always will be a huge fan of the SIRT training pistol and when combined with the L.A.S.R. training software. I believe it's the best training option on the market. While the cost ($400+) is significant, it will pay for itself many times over with the ammo you don't waste. It's the closest you can get to a realistic experience without cycling the slide every pull.

That leaves the resetting triggers. I previously tested the GlockStore resetting trigger for a couple of weeks and ended up returning it so I could purchase a SIRT. I found the resetting trigger to have a long section to the pull that was way too light followed by a heavy and short ending. Compared to the Glok-E-Trainer with the NY2 spring, the E-Trainer is much closer to the real thing, in my opinion. The resetting triggers do have the option of adding a laser cartridge such as the laserlyte (LaserLyte ? Trainer Pistol Cartridge) which opens up a variety of additional training options. However, by the time you do that, the cost is greater than the basic SIRT which is a far more realistic experience.

Net Net - for under $30 the Glok-E-Trainer ($24) + NY2 trigger spring ($2) is a great training option. You just can't beat what you gain for the price. And it will allow holster training with double stack Glock frames (the SIRT only comes in full size).
 

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Agreed !

Thnkx for sharing your experience.
 

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Thank you for your time to test and post!
 

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After reading your review, and looking at the E-Trainer web site, I am thinking that it will not work with my dry fire routine. I use a laser ammo training cartridge. (and therefore I need the firing pin to strike when I pull the trigger.) Am I correct in this?

thanks,
John
 

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Firing pin does not hit, so you cannot use a laser ammo with firing pin function.
...but this is NOT a drawback!

Don't forget that laser ammo with firing pin function show us momentarily if the target was hit!
So, If you use such a laser ammo, you won't have any feedback about your hand and finger movements and mistakes!!!

glok-E-trainer works better (if you prefer) with a laser ammo that is always "on" (which is cheaper! ;) ), so you can find out where you are doing wrong by observing the movement of the laser at the target!

glok-E-trainer focuses on the finger's smooth movement along with the hand and wrist, as it pulls the trigger.
 

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...but this is NOT a drawback!

Don't forget that laser ammo with firing pin function show us momentarily if the target was hit!
So, If you use such a laser ammo, you won't have any feedback about your hand and finger movements and mistakes!!!

glok-E-trainer works better (if you prefer) with a laser ammo that is always "on" (which is cheaper! ;) ), so you can find out where you are doing wrong by observing the movement of the laser at the target!

glok-E-trainer focuses on the finger's smooth movement along with the hand and wrist, as it pulls the trigger.
If I don't do everything correctly, the laser shows as a line/squiggle. When I see a single dot, I know that the gun did not move as the trigger was depressed.

(Living here in the peoples republic of chicago, I am not allowed to own a laser sight.) but then again, I do not plan on living here forever.
 
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