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For you guys that have attended, what did you think. There is one scheduled for next summer within a reasonable distance and I'm considering attending. $150 is pretty reasonable for a one day cert class but I'm more concerned with content than just having a certification hanging on the wall. A one day class is fairly short to go into any great of detail, but is it worth it. I'm not planning on going into business, just trying to expand my knowledge and add it to my resume so to speak for possible future employment. I know I need to be a GSSF member and that's in work already, so what sayeth the armorers.
 

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I feel it was worth it. I don't plan to "use" it for anything other than my personal guns ... and to work on my friends guns. I like the discount and ability to order parts directly from GLOCK. Most of all I gained confidence in my GLOCKs and understand the safety features, etc.

I say GO FOR IT. Besides, then you can select YES in your profile. :cool:
 

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I've taken it twice: initial certification and re-cert.

There are some advantages. If you buy a lot of Glocks, you'll make back the money spent on the course via the additional blue label purchases you can make due to being an armorer. You can also go directly through the factory for parts, but the discount is minimal, and Glocks ordering system is the best technology the 1980s had to offer.

The information in the classes is typically up to date with the latest stuff from the factory.

However, one should understand that the design is very simple, and there are plenty of resources out there to get the info. It makes sense for me to maintain certification simply due to the number of Glocks that I maintain through the agency.
 

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Good points Chief.

Given all that ... I probably won't re-up my cert once it expires. The cert is good for 3 years.

I can order parts from Brownell's. They are nearly as cheap and are more accurate in filling orders ... and I will receive them in a couple of days. GLOCK fills parts within a couple to three weeks but have about a 90% success rate of SCREWING up my orders.

I have slowed down on buying NIB GLOCKs due to the availability of used ones on the market, the fact I have pretty much all I need/will need, and based on the hopes I will continue to win FREE ones through GSSF matches.

It's worth it to do it once time ... after that maybe not.
 

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I feel it was worth it. I don't plan to "use" it for anything other than my personal guns ... and to work on my friends guns. I like the discount and ability to order parts directly from GLOCK. Most of all I gained confidence in my GLOCKs and understand the safety features, etc.

I say GO FOR IT. Besides, then you can select YES in your profile. :cool:
I got my GSSF membership packet last Friday and immediately went online to register for the Armorer's Course in Charleston, SC on December 9th.
Received my confirmation letter by email today. I personally think it's worth the $150 dollars. I plan to use it for the same reasons you stated, VolGrad.
I have taken several gunsmithing courses at a local community college, but never a course on one particular brand of handgun. That has to be a big
confidence builder.
 

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Today I attended the Armorer's Course, and I have to tell you it was the single best day of training I've EVER attended on any subject. The instructor, Dennis Tueller, was experienced, prepared, outgoing, confident, and professional. He has a great delivery style, and was able to keep things relaxed while he went through a lot of information, supported by an excellent computer presentation (PowerPoint, I think) that covered all of the material. The class ran from 8AM to a bit after 5PM, with a half hour for lunch. After a little morning presentation on background material, we spent probably 7 full hours working on the guns (G22s in our class), with every student (about 40 of us) having his/her own gun to work on. We went through complete function and safety testing, field strip and detail strip, and had some time for problem diagnosis. The time just flew by, it was that interesting and absorbing. Dennis and the local Glock LE District Manager, Dave Mallery, were able to answer every question in depth. To cap it off, we all got a current Armorer's Manual and addendum. I'm really glad I was able to get the training, and encourage you to do the same. You'll come away with knowledge you can use immediately with your Glocks, and you'll be able to help your friends with them as well. It's WELL worth the money and the time invested.
 
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Thanks for the info cohland. I'm looking forward to taking the Armorer's course in January.
 

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Today I attended the Armorer's Course, and I have to tell you it was the single best day of training I've EVER attended on any subject. The instructor, Dennis Tueller, was experienced, prepared, outgoing, confident, and professional. He has a great delivery style, and was able to keep things relaxed while he went through a lot of information, supported by an excellent computer presentation (PowerPoint, I think) that covered all of the material. The class ran from 8AM to a bit after 5PM, with a half hour for lunch. After a little morning presentation on background material, we spent probably 7 full hours working on the guns (G22s in our class), with every student (about 40 of us) having his/her own gun to work on. We went through complete function and safety testing, field strip and detail strip, and had some time for problem diagnosis. The time just flew by, it was that interesting and absorbing. Dennis and the local Glock LE District Manager, Dave Mallery, were able to answer every question in depth. To cap it off, we all got a current Armorer's Manual and addendum. I'm really glad I was able to get the training, and encourage you to do the same. You'll come away with knowledge you can use immediately with your Glocks, and you'll be able to help your friends with them as well. It's WELL worth the money and the time invested.
Did you realize that your instructor is the same guy that came up with the "Tueller Drill"?
 

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Did you realize that your instructor is the same guy that came up with the "Tueller Drill"?
Before someone asks ...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tueller_Drill

EDIT: I've done a drill based on this in class before where we had a shooter line up 7 yards off the target with holstered weapon, hands at their side or "stick 'em up" style. I can't recall which. We had a "runner" lined up 7 yards away. At the beep you had to draw & fire 2 shots on target before the runner tagged your shoulder/back. One would think that's easy, right? Not always. You'd be surprised how fast someone can sprint up on you. It would be worse with a knife. Imagine they are running at you and do do get shots off ... their momentum could still drive them into you. I don't want to get stuck so always incorporate a side step if you can.
 

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Before someone asks ...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tueller_Drill

EDIT: I've done a drill based on this in class before where we had a shooter line up 7 yards off the target with holstered weapon, hands at their side or "stick 'em up" style. I can't recall which. We had a "runner" lined up 7 yards away. At the beep you had to draw & fire 2 shots on target before the runner tagged your shoulder/back. One would think that's easy, right? Not always. You'd be surprised how fast someone can sprint up on you. It would be worse with a knife. Imagine they are running at you and do do get shots off ... their momentum could still drive them into you. I don't want to get stuck so always incorporate a side step if you can.
I was going to let them all research it, but you made it easy on them. LOL

---

Just to make sure that everyone understands, the so-called 21 foot rule that came out of theTueller Drill is not some hard and fast rule that makes a self defense shoot good or bad. 21 feet six inches does not mean that you go to jail. Likewise, 20 feet 11 inches doesn't make a bad shoot good.

All the drill is intended to do is reinforce the importance of reactionary gap.
 

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Go for it OP it is a good course
 

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All the drill is intended to do is reinforce the importance of reactionary gap.
Exactly.

Just keep your awareness up and don't wait until it's too late. If I identify a potential threat AND the threat does actually have the means and apparent intent to do me or someone else harm AND they are within this type of distance ... I've already waited to late to draw and present my weapon.

Now, I'm not saying you need to draw down on everyone you see that looks crazy. I'm just saying in this scenario presenting your weapon would sure help you react before it is too late .... as opposed to get stuck in the gut while attempting to clear your cover garment.
 

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Did you realize that your instructor is the same guy that came up with the "Tueller Drill"?
Yes, I knew that going into the course, but Dennis never mentioned it other than to say that he'd spent a good part of his career with the Salt Lake City department.

Dennis was really good about staying "on task" to get the course material covered, although there was the occasional mention of his LE career. He's a heck of an instructor, one of the best I've encountered in any training. It's hard to combine the ability to know a lot, be able to convey the knowledge to the students, and do it in a fashion that makes the students both comfortable and attentive. He never talked "down" to anyone, and there were about 8 or 9 GSSF "Civilians" in the class, a few dealer folks, and maybe a couple dozen LE people.

Chris
 

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Today I attended the Armorer's Course, and I have to tell you it was the single best day of training I've EVER attended on any subject. The instructor, Dennis Tueller, was experienced, prepared, outgoing, confident, and professional. He has a great delivery style, and was able to keep things relaxed while he went through a lot of information, supported by an excellent computer presentation (PowerPoint, I think) that covered all of the material. The class ran from 8AM to a bit after 5PM, with a half hour for lunch. After a little morning presentation on background material, we spent probably 7 full hours working on the guns (G22s in our class), with every student (about 40 of us) having his/her own gun to work on. We went through complete function and safety testing, field strip and detail strip, and had some time for problem diagnosis. The time just flew by, it was that interesting and absorbing. Dennis and the local Glock LE District Manager, Dave Mallery, were able to answer every question in depth. To cap it off, we all got a current Armorer's Manual and addendum. I'm really glad I was able to get the training, and encourage you to do the same. You'll come away with knowledge you can use immediately with your Glocks, and you'll be able to help your friends with them as well. It's WELL worth the money and the time invested.
Congratulations! Sounds like you had an excellent instructor, too.

Definitely a day well spent!
 

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Certificate

What does the Certificate look like? Also, can the certificate be referenced online.......example: punch in the certificate number to validate? In other words, if someone was to doubt that you are certified then can they contact Glock and verify?
 

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The certificate is quite plain. Is says "This certifies that (name) has successfully completed the Armorer's Course 8 hrs". It is signed by Alan Ramsey (Director of Training) and has a class date and expiration date, along with a little artwork. There is no serial number. It cannot be referenced online by us mortals, but I would imagine that a call to Glock Professional (770 - 432 1202) would allow you to verify that a person is an Armorer.

Personally, I just printed up some business cards with the Glock Professional logo on them (permitted for Armorers). Nobody's ever challenged my credentials. But then, I've only handed out about ten cards!

Chris
 

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I was surprised to find that the certificate did not contain a unique serial number for each Glock Armorer...
 

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