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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Out of curiosity I was wondering how many trainers are teaching strong and weak handed shooting as much as I am. After I conduct a basic CCW class I have those who want to move on to defensive pistol. That consists, of course, of the draw, presentation, multiple targets, cover vs. concealment, etc. But I also spend quite a bit of time on strong and weak handed shooting. From my experience in LE and Close Protection the chances of getting two hands on your firearm in a critical situation are pretty slim. Whether it's opening a door, pushing your wife out of the way, holding the dog, etc., etc., etc. Am I alone in this, or do others stress it as much as I do?
 

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In my experience, it really depends on the trainer. Some cover SHO and WHO a little, a lot or not at all.

I have a few friends who recently took a Super Dave Harrington class and they spent a large majority of a two day class shooting one handed at distances up to 25 yds.

I agree one handed shooting and manipulation is an extremely important skill. I always run TLG's dot torture drill that incorporates WHO and SHO during my practice. A few mags every week of one handed at least keeps me proficient.
 

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I don't have as much experience as I would like but it should be incorporated in defensive pistol classes. I practice racking my slide one handed off clothing or my holster. I was actually trying to draw my weapon weak handed the other day. It didn't work well and now i know i need to find a way to do it properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't have as much experience as I would like but it should be incorporated in defensive pistol classes. I practice racking my slide one handed off clothing or my holster. I was actually trying to draw my weapon weak handed the other day. It didn't work well and now i know i need to find a way to do it properly.
No really good way to do that, that I've found. Depends on how you wear it and type of holster.
 

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I was actually trying to draw my weapon weak handed the other day. It didn't work well and now i know i need to find a way to do it properly.
Some of that depends on where you wear your holster. The farther back (or forward) the easier it is. If you wear @ 3 o'clock it is most difficult.

If you wear forward of 3 o'clock you can usually reach across your centerline and draw it. You won't have a fighting grip and might even have to draw it what amounts to upside down. You will then have to use your knees or something to maintain your weapon while you switch it up.

If you wear it behind 3 o'clock it is generally easier to bend over and reach around your back with your weak hand to access your weapon. You will still have to maintain your weapon somehow while you change your grip up.

This is a very dumbed down explanation but hopefully you get the picture.
 

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I do and I appreciate the suggestion. The light brings in a new dynamic however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Some of that depends on where you wear your holster. The farther back (or forward) the easier it is. If you wear @ 3 o'clock it is most difficult.

If you wear forward of 3 o'clock you can usually reach across your centerline and draw it. You won't have a fighting grip and might even have to draw it what amounts to upside down. You will then have to use your knees or something to maintain your weapon while you switch it up.

If you wear it behind 3 o'clock it is generally easier to bend over and reach around your back with your weak hand to access your weapon. You will still have to maintain your weapon somehow while you change your grip up.

This is a very dumbed down explanation but hopefully you get the picture.
Very eloquent. I've occasionally used the appendix carry if spending a lot of time getting in and out of vehicles traveling between numerous locations. Don't really like it, but different situations call for different solutions.
 

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I've trained with Larry Vickers, Ken Hackathorn, and Dave Harrington to name a few of the big names in the industry and all ove them cover quite a bit of weak hand shooting. Ken even runs a drill where you have to pick your handgun up using your week hand then run get on target, shoot and start moving!

In addition I alway mix in some weak hand shooting when I practice. And judging from my weak hand shooting I need more practice at it!
 

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Im with you, I do practice this too. While I was in the Marines, we also trained with our weak hand, and conducted drills with our weak hand such as loading, unloading, reloading and such. I had a friend who got shot in his right arm while we were going trough some villages in Afghanistan, and he was behind an M240 Bravo, he managed to put the machine on his weak arm and continue to manipulate the gun flawlessly. If it wasn't for that extra suppressive fire, who knows what could've happen.
 

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Im with you, I do practice this too. While I was in the Marines, we also trained with our weak hand, and conducted drills with our weak hand such as loading, unloading, reloading and such. I had a friend who got shot in his right arm while we were going trough some villages in Afghanistan, and he was behind an M240 Bravo, he managed to put the machine on his weak arm and continue to manipulate the gun flawlessly. If it wasn't for that extra suppressive fire, who knows what could've happen.
That looks like the answer right there...

Thanks for sharing that with us...
 

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Most of my training I have had uses both...I also make sure I shoot with both...two handed and one handed with both for the fact you could be injuried in a fire fight and as you said no time to get two hands on the weapon...
 

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Depends on the class and what is trying to be taught. There is a big want from many students to outdrive their head lights. People want to get right into the "super secret squirrel ninja" stuff without a firm grasp of the basics.

Most of your top tier trainers will cover it. Mainly becuase most of the students that are willing to put a couple grand into a weekend of training are pretty switched on shooters.

Many local level trainers wont touch one handed TTPs until a "level 2 or 3" class. While each class has a different skill set and ability the instructor should be making sure the students have a firm grasp of the fundementals before moving on to more "advanced" techniques.

the majority of our Close Quarters shooting class is all one handed shooting. We also may incorperate some in a level 2 depending on skill set. Level 3 has a lot of one handed shooting and manipulations.
 

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Most courses I've been through teach both strong and weak hand. Even from the holster with a transitition. But don't forgrt reloads, strong/weak/one handed.
 

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I always teach my students weak hand. In Oklahoma it is NOT part of the Self Defense Act course. In fact the SDA requires that we teach the law, verify that the firearm is in fact servicable and that the student qualifies with the firearm. It does not teach handling a firearm and the instructor may fail the student for any improper actions involving a firearm. In other words......take a course that actually teaches the proper usage and practice, practice, practice.
 
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