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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have asked and received permission to post this video from it's owner. I thought it might be helpful to some that are new to carrying, or that maybe haven't received any qualified training on proper methods. As always, I recommend that you seek out proper training from qualified individuals and do not recommend anyone simply watch a video and attempt to re-create. Also, please note that whenever you are practicing with your weapon, you should always, ALWAYS, triple check that the weapon is clear before attempting any training.

As I stated this is not me in the video but the person demonstrating the technique is very well versed in handgun manipulation. He is a trainer and has an extensive background. A "Been There, Done That" guy if you will. This draw stroke was the method I was taught about 4 years ago. This was after I had been shooting for about 30 years, doing it incorrectly. When I say incorrectly, it was the way I was taught 30, 20, 10 years ago, etc.. At that time, the process I was taught was probably the correct process but as with everything else, things improve and newer/better ways are often found.

In general, although it looks like one fluid movement, which it should, this is often referred to as the 4 step draw.
Step 1 - Get a proper firing grip on your weapon. Once you bring it out of the holster, you should not have to alter your grip at all. If your holster, or method of carry requires you to do this, you may want to rethink your holster or method of carry.
Step 2 - "Tickle the Nipple". I know, it sounds silly but basically, once you have the proper grip, you draw straight up, to the point on your chest, where your thumb can "tickle your nipple". If necessary, the gun could be angled towards and assailant at this point and fired, although the shot would probably be low so take that into consideration.
Step 3 - This is the step where your properly gripped firearm, which is now at chest level, meets the support hand. Again, if necessary, the weapon can now be fired, and also note that in this same step, the firearm should move from your chest level to your eye level.
Step 4 - This is where you punch out towards the target.

Note that the dry fire "click" happens at the very end of the push/punch out (Step 4) and there is no delay in time. Again, it's one fluid movement.

There are slight deviations and much more detail that can be put into each step but again, this is simply a way to let new shooters, or inexperienced shooters view a proper draw stroke. If you seek additional information about this method, you should seek qualified training.

 

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As I stated this is not me in the video but the person demonstrating the technique is very well versed in handgun manipulation. He is a trainer and has an extensive background. A "Been There, Done That" guy if you will.
Oh Oh Oh I know I know I know.

FTR this guy has real world operational experience and was the head instructor at one of the premier firearms schools in the country for years. He still trains folks, just not there. He is an avid competitor as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I haven't put out his name because I did not ask permission to do so, not that I really think he would mind but I'd rather ask permission first rather than ask for forgiveness in this case. LOL

Edit to Add - I spent some time practicing my reloads this past Monday with the over the top, grab the slide method but I want to work some practice in of using the slide stop instead. He seems to be using his thumb of his support hand in this video to drop the slide. I tried using my firing hand thumb, under some "speed" but missed it more often than not, even with an extended slide stop installed. Coming in with the support hand, seems to put the thumb at a better angle to positively drop it with much less chance of missing or not hitting it hard enough.

For me, it's just another example that no one should stop learning. It should be a continuing , evolving process for anyone that is actually preparing themselves to use a firearm for self defense. Could I use my firearm to defend myself or my family right now, yes I could but can I be much, MUCH better at it, YES I can!
 

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Personally I go over the top. I cant be consistent enough with hitting the slide stop on the glocks to be comfortable doing it every time. The extended SS's interfere with my grip.

Good video.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's the way I've been doing it for quite some time. I just wanted to give the SS method a good try and then evaluate what works best for me. I've heard of people that use the thumbs forward grip having problems with the extended slide stop getting in the way and locking the slide back. I use this thumbs forward method and I haven't had a problem with it locking the slide back or dropping it when it should be locked back due to empty mag. I do however, try to keep my thumbs angled away from the slide so as not to push it to the right.
 

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I'll do the best to describe what I do. not sure how it will come out but here goes.

There's a lot of talk about grip. what percentage of force what hand puts where. I think two many people over think it. I grip 100 percent with both hands. Even with gripping hard the thumbs seem to work off a different muscle group. they exert some force on the slide but not to much but enough to hit the SS. Doesnt happen all the time but still does. I actually cut the SS off my carry gun. Leaving enough that i can lock it back if necessary but leaving it flush with the frame.

In classes students ask the question SS vs Over the top all the time. I usually answer "yes". Then tell them what ever works for you. I give my reasons for using the over hand, one of which is consistency with slide manipulations. and let them decide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Another reason I wanted to practice using the SS is in case the support hand was damaged on inoperable. I know and have practiced racking the slide off of objects such as my holster, thigh, cover, etc.. but I just wanted to add an option. I'm with you on what works best for an individual is the right answer. When a trainer says "do it this way", without discussing or demonstrating options, I get worried.
 

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Pretty much everything we teach we teach multiple ways. running reps of each and then tell them. From now on its on you.

Ive been to many instructors that are of the "my way is best" mentality. That and teaching outdated techniques from their military or LEO careers 20 years ago.\

always evolve never stop learning.
 

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I use the SS ... always. The only exception to that is with micro guns like the LCP or LC9.

I generally use my strong hand thumb, pre-loaded on the SS. As I insert the mag (and am sure it is seated properly) I apply pressure (almost simultaneously) to the SS. This makes for a very fast re-load. I know there is the potential for dropping the slide too early so you really have to practice. This technique is courtesy of Todd Green. I learned it in his AFHF class last year.

I have experimented with using my weak hand thumb to drop the SS as I re-acquire my grip but find it to be not as fast and less instinctive as the method previously described.
 
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