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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
GREAT write up on dry fire practice and a suggested routine to follow. Hope you guys find it useful.

**ALWAYS remember to make sure your firearm is 100% clear before attempting any dry fire practice. Then check it again before starting and just to be sure, check it once more. Separate the ammo and store it well away from your training area. Also, even though you have tripled checked that your firearm is clear, you should still never point the firearm at a living person. Practice pointing at a person on TV if you must.

pistol-training.com » Blog Archive » Dry Fire Routine
 
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Dry fire practice is probably one of the best training tools one can have.

A very good friend of mine and training mentor once told me, "Keith, anyone can punch holes in paper. The thing that sets target shooters apart from people who fight with guns, is how well they run it. What do they do when the gun goes click. Weapons manipulation is everything."

Weapons manipulation can be practiced a thousand times a day... for free. Draws, reloads, malfunction clearance, ect can all be done in your home. So when you go to the range you can focus on things that you need live fire to do. It saves money and increases your skills dramatically.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Draws, reloads, malfunction clearance, ect can all be done in your home
... when your wife lets you. :)

I get the stink eye after about 5-10 minutes, but based on the information provided above, it doesn't take much more than that 5 times a week for great practice.
 

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I would say "Lucky" but I'd be lost without mine. I can find a quiet place away for 10-15 minutes a day to practice dry fire to keep her happy. :)
 

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Practice pointing at a person on TV if you must.
I have gotten lax with my dry fire practice but when I do I use the TV as a POA. It works good because the people are usually moving. It gives you a little practice acquiring a sight picture quickly and pressing the trigger before the target moves or is no longer on the screen/in the shot. Note my play on words? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Key for me is incorporating other things in my dry fire. Not simply working on trigger control. I started doing more manipulation, draw strokes, mag changes, etc.. when I found this document some months ago. AS the experts will tell you, every time you draw from holster/concealment to practice dry firing, you are working that draw stroke (hopefully correctly) into your muscle memory.

Keep in mind that if you don't know what you are doing and you practice it incorrectly, you are working that incorrect muscle memory into your process. Always seek qualified training!
 

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I have gotten lax with my dry fire practice but when I do I use the TV as a POA. It works good because the people are usually moving. It gives you a little practice acquiring a sight picture quickly and pressing the trigger before the target moves or is no longer on the screen/in the shot. Note my play on words? ;)
+1 :cool:
 

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Good info, Law...

Sometimes I attach a laser when I'm practicing dry fire trigger control... Makes it real apparent if you jerk or move the trigger...
 
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