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When I took a defensive handgun class, our instructors told us that when the slide is locked back, after loading a charged magazine the best way to chamber the round was to pull back on the slide and let it snap back into battery. Before then I always thumbed the slide stop lever.

What's are people's thoughts about either technique?
 

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I've always been taught and practice the same. I only use the slide release when the gun is empty. Aside from aiding in muscle memory for speed mag re-loadings as well as clearing jams with the "tap & rack" method, pulling back and snapping the slide to return to battery also offers that extra fraction of an inch of momentum and force to get that round chambered properly.
 

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It is supposed to be a faster and more sure way of getting the support hand on the weapon. This way the support hand is right "there" just slide it into place while extending the arms if it is not doing other things like blocking, pushing, pulling etc at the moment.
 

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I use the slide stop to release the slide forward. I think what you were "taught" depends on who taught you. I have taken classes with the same instructors as Bulldawg and they indeed teach to rack the slide. I have since taken classes from a few other instructors and they teach either is fine. In fact, Larry Vickers teaches on a 1911 you should actually use the slide stop lever and rather than racking the slide.

I do it because it works and I find it faster.

Something else I do ... if I am not actually doing an emegency re-load during a string of fire ... is always do a press check after loading a magazine. I don't do this because of the way I release the slide forward ... I just do it as a good safety measure.
 

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I've done both, but the conventional wisdom of the shooting world is to rack the slide, which is what I do. This is definitely the practice endorsed by Glock to the point that they call the part a slide lock lever and not a slide release lever.
 

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I rack the slide. I do so because of some of the reasons Bulldawg mentioned. In a malfunction, the first step is to Tap Rack Bang, which is the same motion as "sling shotting" the slide forward. Doing it the same way, every time helps in muscle memory for when things go south and a person potentially loses all fine muscle control.
 

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In a malfunction, the first step is to Tap Rack Bang, which is the same motion as "sling shotting" the slide forward. Doing it the same way, every time helps in muscle memory for when things go south and a person potentially loses all fine muscle control.
I agree with this logic to a point. I know this is "the standard" by which most teach.

However, while a re-load is a "stoppage" it isn't a "malfunction". Why should they be treated the same? If I am doing a re-load my hands are already in the right place to use the slide stop lever to release the slide as I am re-acquiring my firing grip. One can either use their strong hand thumb (if it's long enough to reach easily) or they can use their support hand thumb as it is already RIGHT THERE. It works. It's fast. I don't see the need for the extra step of racking the slide.
 

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Agreed but I also think I do it this way because of the fact I carried a 1911 for so long, and you aren't supposed to let them slam on an empty chamber. Just habit more than anything. I actually used the slide release to release the slide last night after cleaning my 19c. Something didn't feel right about it after I put it back together and I thought the slide release had stopped my slide when I didn't want it to.

Upon further examination, the spring apparently wasn't sitting right and the slide release was not staying in the down position. I took the pins back out and made sure it was seated properly. The bottom pin went in with no issue but the top pin seemed to be hitting the spring. I pushed the spring down slightly to let the pin clear and the firearm started functioning properly. With my recent issue with the slide lock, I'm a little leary of making sure all the pieces are working as designed.
 

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For me, I've been racking the slide, not using the release. That's my primary method since being left handed, my thumbs are on the wrong side. And I know I could change the slide lock to the other side, but why bother, it works fine as is. I can use the release with my finger, if I didn't have use of my other hand (I can also manually engage the lock in a similar manner if need be).

Besides isn't it more badass to rack the slide? :rolleyes:


Jeff
 

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Agreed but I also think I do it this way because of the fact I carried a 1911 for so long, and you aren't supposed to let them slam on an empty chamber.

Upon further examination, the spring apparently wasn't sitting right and the slide release was not staying in the down position. I took the pins back out and made sure it was seated properly. The bottom pin went in with no issue but the top pin seemed to be hitting the spring. I pushed the spring down slightly to let the pin clear and the firearm started functioning properly. With my recent issue with the slide lock, I'm a little leary of making sure all the pieces are working as designed.
WRT to the first part I quoted ...
Some will argue this is bad. Others say it's fine. I listen to LAV as he's the Godfather of the 1911 according to many and he says go for it. In the case of a re-load the chamber isn't empty anyway and LAV specifically says use the slide stop lever to drop the slide after a re-load.

WRT the second part I quoted ...
The top pin you speak of is generally finicky that way. The slide stop spring & lever is notorious for being in the way. I always have to do the following ... put the spring in place then start the pin in gently, if met with resistance gently wiggle the spring/lever forward/back until the pin slides in all the way. Make sure the pin is in place good. It's the groove in the pin that actually holds the pin in place. The Gen4 G19 I have is a B!tC# to get back in. It is the most difficult of any GLOCK I've ever owned.
 

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Yeah the issue I was having was with my 3rd Gen and I had to physically push down the spring slightly to get the top pin in, but once I did that, everything seems to work perfectly.
 

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However, while a re-load is a "stoppage" it isn't a "malfunction". Why should they be treated the same?
While each of us is free to do whatever we feel is right, I do believe we should all treat a "stoppage" as a "malfunction". Training your brain and your muscles to treat these as two different occurrences forcing two different reactions will undoubtedly slow you down. You might not notice it at the range and it certainly doesn't count there.....but God forbid the day ever comes when a fraction of a second might make all the difference in the world.....we should all not have to slow down enough to think at that instance. JMHO
 

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While each of us is free to do whatever we feel is right, I do believe we should all treat a "stoppage" as a "malfunction". Training your brain and your muscles to treat these as two different occurrences forcing two different reactions will undoubtedly slow you down. You might not notice it at the range and it certainly doesn't count there.....but God forbid the day ever comes when a fraction of a second might make all the difference in the world.....we should all not have to slow down enough to think at that instance. JMHO
You are correct sir. We should all do whatever it is we train to do.

I have never faced a real life incident which required a re-load (and hope I never do) but have done it in class and in IDPA and find the way I do it to be natural and fast ... for me. But ... like you said neither way is wrong.
 

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my personal opinion is that you were told correct.

the reason you hand rack the slide is because..

A: its a gross motor skill and not a fine motor skill like thumbing the slide stop is. when ina fight, flight or freeze mentality or (black mindset) your fine motor skills are seriously impaired so you might not even find that slide stop like you think you would.

B: the slide stop lever on your pistol is in a certain location. if i hand you a totally different pistol its now in a different spot and if you trained to use the slide stop lever in a black mindset then now your all screwed up and probably looking at the gun.

C: you never trust that your gun will function properly. what if the slide dosent even lock back on the final round? you of course are going to fire on an empty chamber either way. but then your going to drop that magazine and then put a new one in and when you do you will need to rack the slide to chamber a round. so you have one motion for multiple things. and simple is best

all these reasons are purely combat.
 

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my personal opinion is that you were told correct.

the reason you hand rack the slide is because..

A: its a gross motor skill and not a fine motor skill like thumbing the slide stop is. when ina fight, flight or freeze mentality or (black mindset) your fine motor skills are seriously impaired so you might not even find that slide stop like you think you would.

B: the slide stop lever on your pistol is in a certain location. if i hand you a totally different pistol its now in a different spot and if you trained to use the slide stop lever in a black mindset then now your all screwed up and probably looking at the gun.

C: you never trust that your gun will function properly. what if the slide dosent even lock back on the final round? you of course are going to fire on an empty chamber either way. but then your going to drop that magazine and then put a new one in and when you do you will need to rack the slide to chamber a round. so you have one motion for multiple things. and simple is best

all these reasons are purely combat.
Major

You continually speak of combat. May I ask what your experience is that has provided you with this combat information?
 

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B: the slide stop lever on your pistol is in a certain location. if i hand you a totally different pistol its now in a different spot and if you trained to use the slide stop lever in a black mindset then now your all screwed up and probably looking at the gun.
Interesting. I've owned dozens and dozens, maybe hundreds of pistols and all the auto-loaders had the slide stop lever in pretty much the same place, right there above and/or slightly behind the trigger guard area where the slide meets the frame.
 
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