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When I'm no longer broke I'll have a 'go bag' or something similar. Nothing too exciting, some non perishable food, enough for a week at most, first aid and trauma kit, two loaded magazines for my pistol and AR15, and enough room for other stuff as needed. Probably throw a computer and other 'non emergency' stuff in there for when I take trips. I'll probably also have a basic 'survival kit' that is waterproof and has lighter, solar blanket, compass, etc. Again, nothing too extravegant, plus my first aid kit has some survival stuff in it. Also a bottle or two of water.

My theory is less is more. To start, most situations I will encounter that would make use of this bag will leave me stranded for a few days at most. Don't need a pickup truck full of stuff for that. Put too much stuff together and I'll never take it anywhere. On the off chance that I AM stranded somewhere for an extended period I will most likely have a gun on me and I can get my own supply of food. If am going somewhere where an 'extended vacation' is a possibility (like hunting) then I bring more stuff...
 

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We have quite a bit of stuff prepared at the house for SHTF situations but I haven't really worked on a Bug Out Bag like I should. I will be.
 

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i think im going to switch up my Bug Out Bag setup. i went camping/hiking yesterday through early today. and i realized id like a much smaller bag. my backpack i carry now isnt very big at all but id prefer some thing even smaller. i had one heck of a time moving through thick brush with my average sized backpack so i think im going to try somthing out.... im going to try and fit all required items with some trimming of the list...into a basic camelback with a couple zip pouches. ill keep you guys posted.
 

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Here’s what I have so far. It’s a lot but most of it is my “stay at home” kit.
Folding shovel, hatchet/hammer, three tarps, bungees, Paracord and rope, zip ties, fleece blankets, sleeping bags, nails and screws, duct tape.
Alice load bearing belt with pouches and spare holster, 100 rounds ammo for both guns.
Mil surplus pack, Multi-tool, Folding knife, Swiss army knife, compass, binoculars, signal whistle, walkie talkies. Lots of batteries.
Two mess kits, water purification kit and extra pur packets, Granola bars, case of bottled water, dry cereal, powdered drink mix.
Aluminum foil, ziplock bags, trash bags, disposable cups,
Gloves, hats, socks, spare clothes, boots, ponchos, flashlights.
Fire steel, water proof matches, tinder all in waterproof container.
Sterno stove and sterno, kerosene lantern.

There are probably a few things I am forgetting.
I need to add more non-perishable food. We have a shelf of canned food and dry foods in the basement for if we have to stay put.
 

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Definitely snagged some great ideas from all of you. In mine I have 10 packs of energy gel, one pack could keep you going for a few days. Firesteel with three tins of maya dust(great if you cant find good tinder only a pinch can start a fire). First aid kit with quickclot. A light weight machete attached, a small knife and a mini pry bar. Heat blanket, pen water purifier a few quart size ziploc's. Small shaker flashlight. very light, but quality travel rod and reel(with assorted hooks) makes catching fish mush easier and allows you to cast if needed. other small things I cant think of at the moment.
 

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4 things that I have not seen mentioned yet: Baseball cap, cheap sunglasses, bug spray, and ziplock bags.
 

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Some BOB thoughts:
GPS: Okay for a while but non-hardened electronics and the outdoors are not friends. Batteries fail, fragile innards get damaged, and if the world REALLY goes Tango Uniform the system itself will become unreliable. Good maps of your area are better, on outdoor paper if you can get it. Them and a Cammenga tritium compass along with the proficiency in using them are more reliable. Even without maps the compass and known points will work. You can even make your own map. GPS is good for vehicle, though. Just plan on leaving it in there. Compass and pace beads are what I'd rely on once I get out of it.
Tarp: Yes! Small, light, and makes an expedient shelter much faster. If you are worried about weight make your own custom tarps from Tyvek housewrap, double-sticky duct tape and grommets. The roll of Tyvek is expensive (around a hundred at Lowe's or Depot) so it's best to go in on it with some buddies and split the cost. Makes an amazing tarp.
Walkie Talkies/Radios: Can be good and even better combined with SW receivers. This one takes some preparation - get an Amateur Radio license. An Amateur Radio handheld is FAR superior to anything that comes in a blister pack and will combine many devices into one. Example: My Yaesu VX-6R is a walkie talkie that works on 4 bands of Amateur frequencies, with a little modification can talk to FRS/GMRS, and is a receiver from AM all the way through 900MHz. It's also waterproof so if you go out into the rain it won't get damaged. More powerful than a blister-pack radio, too. The drawback is that they are expensive but the cost is worth it. My ideal setup (Google these to understand) is a Yaesu FT-817 as a base radio on solar power and SLA batteries and a Yaesu VX-6R per 2 people in my group. The Amateur license isn't required to OWN these but getting it will give you the understanding of HOW to use them.
Vehicle: Not seeing much in how you plan to include your vehicle in your plan. Yes, we're talking about bags, but to me my 4x4 truck is one of those bags. Level 1 of my carry is pockets. Nice to be certified as an EMT as that's my excuse to wear the pants all the time. 19 pockets in my favorites! This gets me home or to the vehicle to get home. Level 2 is the back. I use a backpacking-specific 35-liter pack with all the typical wilderness-survival goodies. This supports me in the home if utilities fail or in the field if I have to abandon the home. Research ultralight backpacking to see how I filled it. Level 3 is the truck where I can add a bag with my comms gear, a bag with my med gear, the food bag, and whatever else I need. This supports me and mine when the vehicle becomes home or gets me to a new one.
Along those lines, learning about ultralight backpacking will enhance your BOB techniques. Once you get out of your vehicle and are carrying every ounce will count. Also, modularity is good - everybody in your group should have a bag that contains what they need.
Oh, by the way, hi guys!
 

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Them most important thing about a go bag is planning. Where do you plan to go? how many people are with you that you will need suplies for you. Distances you may be traveling? urban or wilderness? Skill set with the tools you plan on carrying? your ability to use the minimum to get the maximum.

Almost every ones bag will be different because of the above. I know people that can be dropped almost anywhere with a buter knife and survive. On the flip side, i know people that would be eaten by a lion in a Michigan woods.

I dont really have a bug OUT bag. if something happens im pretty much staying put. What i do have is a Bug in bag or a truck bag. This rides in my truck all the time.

Most of the area that i frequent would be more of a country setting.

Some things off the top of my head thats in it:

Medical Supplies
izzy bandage
TK
Glock knife
S&W .357
Leatherman
metal wire for snares/ whatever else
Mini bic lighter/ blast match
small pill bottle with fishing gear
2 glow sticks
compass
water purification tablets and neutralizers
200 ft para cord
3 cheap walmart ponchos

i know theres more but without going to my truck i cant remember everything. all this is housed in a Maxpedition Colossus versipak. on the strap i have attached a canteen that i change out every 3 weeks. this is enough basic stuff for me to survive on for days... i know because ive done it. i dont carry food, if you know what your doing food is plentiful, no need to take up space and make more weight.

The second most important thing is training. train to use the things you have. I know a lot of guys that have no clue how to use whats in their packs. full med kits with not even a basic knowledge of first aid.

like I said, everyone bag depends on their individual needs.

KeithD
 

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Responding to my own quote, but is there anything I am missing for a 15 mile walk?

A county map, definitely.
Kudos for thinking of a Get-Home-Bag. You're definitely in the minority even among preppers.
SHOES/SOCKS for any type weather. All weather outerwear.
flashlights (with red lens option).
Also depends on scenarios - do you want to be found or not.
Any natural barriers between work & home? roads/bridges may not be open.
 

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..... i dont carry food, if you know what your doing food is plentiful, no need to take up space and make more weight.

The second most important thing is training. train to use the things you have. I know a lot of guys that have no clue how to use whats in their packs. full med kits with not even a basic knowledge of first aid.

like I said, everyone bag depends on their individual needs.

KeithD
agree totally with your training philosophy. And experience the training regularly. a set date perhaps REGARDLESS of weather. best to train in the elements than trying to figure out issues real-time in the rain/cold/wind, etc. Like you I can live 3 days in any most any weather however I DO carry 3000 calories bars. While food can be plentiful, I may not want my movements detected depending on what SOL condition may exist. doesn't take up inordinate amount of room or weight considering potential benefit. My opinion & $4 will get you a starbucks ... LOL
 
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