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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
At my gun club we teach an Action Range Certification class, where I have been one of the instructors for about a year. We teach the grip illustrated in the following photos, which I will try to explain here:

1. Grip the pistol with the strong hand as shown in the first and second photos. Note that when your trigger finger is not going to be on the trigger to shoot, it should be held up on the frame or slide to prevent an accidental discharge. The strong hand creates a gap that you fill with the support hand (noted in the photo). It is important to get the strong hand as high on the back of the pistol's beavertail as you can, putting you in position to better manage recoil.

Grip 1.jpg

Grip 2.jpg

2. Rotate the support hand forward slightly and fill the gap, shown in the third photo. The photo does not show much rotation on my support hand, but I hope you get the idea: rotate it a little to make it fit the gap. Both thumbs should be pointing forward, but providing no support. For right-handed Glock shooters, be sure to keep your right thumb below the ridge that sits beneath the slide stop lever so that you don't accidentally activate the slide stop or prevent it from activating when it should. The four fingers of the support hand wrap around the knuckles of the strong hand. We teach our students to keep their support hand index fingers off the front of the trigger guard, because if it touches the trigger guard it will inadvertently steer the gun. The support hand index finger is better used to provide more strength to the grip.

Grip 3.jpg

3. The fourth photo shows the grip established with the finger on the trigger, ready to fire.

Grip 3.jpg

4. The last photo shows that the hands fit together without gaps. This may vary depending on the amount of flesh on the shooter's hands, but if we see a gap there it is often a sign that the grip is "off" or that it has come undone when shooting, which is common with new shooters. Where I stand when I am teaching, behind and to the side of the shooter, I can see the gap clearly if it is there, and the shooter can easily see it as well. Sometimes we use a Sharpie to make a "witness mark" across the point where the base of the the thumbs are touching, to remind them to keep the grip together. (We are sure to ask for their permission before writing on their hands!)

Grip 4.jpg

What you cannot see clearly in the photos is the position of the trigger finger: we teach students to pull straight back through the trigger "break" to the stop, using the pad in the middle of the distal phalanx of the trigger finger. I'm kind of proud of all that medical anatomy talk, I just looked it up! The point where we teach them to pull the trigger is in red in the attached drawing. We also teach them to release the trigger only as far as the reset, so that follow-up shots are quicker and there is less movement of the trigger finger.

Trigger Pull.jpg

Grip and Trigger Pull.jpg

I am not, by any means, saying that this is the only way it should be done. I am saying that this is what we teach new pistol shooters, and we get good results with this grip.



Chris
 

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Not only adresses shooting but also an anatomy and physiology lesson, dude!
 

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Bravo, and thanks.
 

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:) well done sir.
 

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Awesome post. Thanks, Chris! Times like these I wish we still had the blog section.
All of Chris' posts are stuck to the top of the "Training & Tactics" forum so they will be easy to find...
 

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Thnkx Chris very informative !
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Once again Chris has nailed it. Many thanks!
Thnkx Chris very informative !
You're most welcome, guys, thanks for the feedback. I should remind the readers that the information in these posts is not something that I personally developed, I am just playing back what I have learned in the Action Range Classes that we teach with several instructors, a couple of whom are ex-LE instructors, and all of whom are USPSA competitors.

Chris
 

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This is exactly what my tac. pistol instructor teaches as well.
I just join the forum and I have been trying to find a picture on how to correctly hold you hand gun. Very informative. The picture did a lot of justice. Thanks for sharing. This helped me a lot.
Pappy
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I just join the forum and I have been trying to find a picture on how to correctly hold you hand gun. Very informative. The picture did a lot of justice. Thanks for sharing. This helped me a lot.
Pappy
Hey, Pappy, that's great to hear. Thanks for the feedback!

Chris
 

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Tried your idea last weekend while my wife and I were in the desert doing a little practice. Low and behold, I was able to hit a spent 12 gauge shotgun shell from about 25-30 feet away. Thanks again for sharing the information. Will post a link to the video once I figure out how to convert the mobile video to youtube friendly.
 

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Been shooting low and to the left lately with my G23 Gen3 using two hand grip. A few weekends ago I was able to hit an empty shotgun shell from about 15-20 feet away strong hand shooting. Two handed was hitting tight center target groups.
Saw various "charts" online with o;clock hits meaning blah blah blah.
Ammo used yesterday with the low and to the left hits; 165gr Speer Gold Dot LEO; 180gr HST LEO; 180gr PPU; 170gr TulAmmo; Winchester White Box 180gr FMJ.
Aside from a few all were low and left..

Help, I'm a disgrace to the Glock community. :eek:
 

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Been shooting low and to the left lately with my G23 Gen3 using two hand grip. A few weekends ago I was able to hit an empty shotgun shell from about 15-20 feet away strong hand shooting. Two handed was hitting tight center target groups.
Saw various "charts" online with o;clock hits meaning blah blah blah.
Ammo used yesterday with the low and to the left hits; 165gr Speer Gold Dot LEO; 180gr HST LEO; 180gr PPU; 170gr TulAmmo; Winchester White Box 180gr FMJ.
Aside from a few all were low and left..

Help, I'm a disgrace to the Glock community. :eek:
You're anticipating the recoil. Next time you shoot, have someone else load your magazines and place some snap caps in with the regular rounds. ( keeping you from seeing if and where) That'll show just how far you're pushing. 99.9% of low and left shots are due to recoil anticipation. Every shot should "surprise" you.
 

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Headed to the desert once I can track down some 180gr FMJ for a reasonable price. Will re-evaluate my technique, actually was doing a few point and shoot drills without putting thought into my shots. Read where I could be gripping the strong hand too tightly thus causing the low and to the left shots.
Thanks again brother.
 

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I just saw a propaganda video clip of the North Korean soldiers on the firing line with their rifles and handguns. On the semi-auto handguns, they all used the "teacup" grip, using their non-shooting hand to support the base of their shooting hand. Their trainers may be watching old "24" reruns! :eek:
 

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Thanks for the visual aids! Extremely helpful.

New guy here with an FNG question. :) Is there any adaptation to this grip technique for lefties? The last time I tried this grip, on my M&P22, my thumbs were getting singed and covered in gunpowder residue. I'm a bit tentative to see how much worse it could be with a 9mm. What should a lefty do with their thumbs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for the visual aids! Extremely helpful.

New guy here with an FNG question. :) Is there any adaptation to this grip technique for lefties? The last time I tried this grip, on my M&P22, my thumbs were getting singed and covered in gunpowder residue. I'm a bit tentative to see how much worse it could be with a 9mm. What should a lefty do with their thumbs?
I'm a lefty and this is the grip I use. I have never had a noticeable problem with powder residue on my thumbs using this grip. And we have an advantage, since it's impossible for use to inadvertently activate the slide stop lever with our thumbs: it's on the other side of the gun!

Chris
 
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