Glock Pro Forums banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Getting the gun out of the holster is important, doing it safely is absolutely mandatory. Since we are dealing with a cross-section of shooting skills in our Action Range Certification class, we focus on the beginner, emphasizing safety and control over speed. We teach that if the shooter learns the fundamentals of a safe draw, speed will come once smoothness is practiced.

The draw we teach has four distinct steps when done in slow motion. During our firing line exercises, we have the students execute each step and stop, with repetition, until they begin to put the pieces together smoothly.

The first step in the draw has two important elements. First, the shooter's support hand (not the gun hand) is to be touching the chest or abdomen. The important thing is not that they are touching themselves on the body, but that their support hand CANNOT GET IN FRONT OF THE GUN. By having them touch their abdomen, we're sure that the support hand is out of the way, and it stays there through the first two steps of the draw.

The second element of the first step is to push the gun hand down on to the gun, firmly seating the hand high on the grip (beavertail, if the gun has one), and firmly gripping the gun with the last three fingers of the gun hand. This is the first component of the grip, and once it is established it should not need to be adjusted.

If the shooter is using a holster with a locking device such as the one shown, we make sure that the trigger finger is pointed straight along the holster. Just slight pressure will release the lock. We do not want the shooter to bend the trigger finger or make a big effort at pushing the lock, because doing so can put the trigger finger right into the trigger guard when the gun comes out.

Shorts Plant Hat Cap Trunks


The second step in the draw also has two elements. First, the support hand remains touching the abdomen, where you can't cover it with the muzzle. Second, the gun is smoothly drawn from the holster and rotated 90 degrees, held close to the body so that, if necessary, it could be fired before completely establishing the grip. While this does not happen in competition (that I can think of) it is easy to image "social interactions" that might require the gun to be fired from this position.

Shorts White Hat Recreation Cap


In the third step of the draw, we move the support hand off the abdomen and establish the grip fully, naturally moving the gun forward a bit to do so.

Shorts Hat Bermuda shorts Asphalt Baseball cap


Finally, with the grip established, the shooter pushes the gun up and straight out, extending the arms, so that the sights are aligned on the target. We usually have a bit of difficulty here with some students, where we see various TV-shootemup-induced variations of gun handling. Some we call "bowling", where the pistol is swooped down to the ground, then too far up, then on target. We also see "fly fishing" or "Charlie's Angels" moves, where the pistol is pushed up too high before being brought down to settle on the target. Both of these mistakes waste time, generate extra work to settle the gun down, and in one case may become a safety hazard if the gun is pointed over the berm. At our club we are pretty strict about keeping all firearms with their muzzles pointed below the edge of the berm for safety reasons.

Shorts Cap Outdoor recreation Air gun Hat


That's our offering on the draw.

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Chris Nice Job, Can't ask for more than that.......your photos are right on...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,503 Posts
Agreed, great information, thnkx Chris.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
Great write up. Thank you for doing these Chris! Awesome work as always.

As you previously stated, there will be slight variations between competition shooting disciplines, defensive shooting, gun fighting etc.. For example, in the 4 step draw method, my hands are slightly higher (tickle the nipple)on step 2 of the draw stroke and my support hand comes to meet the firearm earlier and (again) higher than what is show in picture #2. The firearm is basically already in my line of sight on step 3 where my hands meet as I press out to step 4.

The key to note, regardless of what type of shooting you are doing that these pictures and info illustrate is that one should not swing \up the firearm out of the holster into their line of sight in an arching motion. This tends to leave the shooter arching too high which takes the firearm too high on his/her sight alignment resulting in a high first shot.

Another great thing these point out is that the old Tea Cup grip is outdated and if you are still using it, you should look into some training! :) Thanks again for the work and effort!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
A teacup grip is one where the firing hand is gripping in a similar fashion as above but the support hand "cups" underneath the butt of the firearm and the shooting hand. It is very common from the revolver days but has been replaced, like many other things, with a more modern grip that allows for more uniform control of the firearm as well as more uniform recoil management.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,628 Posts
Here's an example of that "teacup" or "cup and saucer grip"-- this is what NOT to do. As an aside, here's hoping that Jack Bauer and the future "24" movie fixes that grip. Arm Photographer Flash photography Camera lens Video camera
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just poking around the forum, checking for interesting topics, found this tread, still relevant and extremely important to us newbies.

Thanks for the info.
You're welcome! It's good to see that this particular series of posts seems to have some "staying power".

Did you also see the ones on Stance, and The Grip & Trigger Pull? If you have any critique of them, anything that is not clear or that you think is questionable, please let me know. These can be edited. We had a flurry of comments about the original post on Grip & Trigger Pull because I had my finger hovering over the trigger, so I changed it to make the correction.

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Draw

You're welcome! It's good to see that this particular series of posts seems to have some "staying power".

Did you also see the ones on Stance, and The Grip & Trigger Pull? If you have any critique of them, anything that is not clear or that you think is questionable, please let me know. These can be edited. We had a flurry of comments about the original post on Grip & Trigger Pull because I had my finger hovering over the trigger, so I changed it to make the correction.

Chris
No, not yet, but I will keep and eye open for it. I only get a few chances a day to look around, but I will look at it.

I did see hitchcock45's Youtube video on stance and arm position, but I have sooooo much to learn and so little time. Ha HA!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
No, not yet, but I will keep and eye open for it. I only get a few chances a day to look around, but I will look at it. I did see hitchcock45's Youtube video on stance and arm position, but I have sooooo much to learn and so little time. Ha HA!
I have not seen hickcok45's video, but I will look for it. If you see differences between what I have posted and what he says, don't feel conflicted. There are a number of different ways to do this, so my advice is to look at alternatives and make a judgment based on what you see. It may be that you make some adjustments to the "patterns" to suit yourself better.

Remember, what I posted is directed toward action shooting competition, such as USPSA, and not necessarily to defensive (or "social", as some describe them....) scenarios.

Chris
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Joe,

It all makes sense to me. He is more articulate than the posts we have, he explains things a bit more, but I think the grip covered in our thread is nearly identical to what he is teaching. He mentioned something about "open guard" that I didn't quite understand, but there seem to be more videos or books to explain this.

In summary, it all looks reasonable to me.

Chris
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top