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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
As a brief introduction, I'm engel556, I'm 22 living in an apartment and going to school online while I work. I have no experience at all with guns (never owned, held, or fired one), though I know a bit about them from online research. I'm soon to make my first purchase and I'm sold on Glock primarily for the safety technology.

With that said, I know you've probably seen the question "what is the best Glock?" a thousand times. I'm not going to come in here and drop such a subjective question. Rather, I'd like to give you some information and hopefully you can guide me in the right direction.

I intend to purchase my first Glock in the next few months. It will serve as a home defense weapon, but will probably only ever be fired at the range. I will be taking a new shooter's course and a home defense course after my purchase (both taught by local LEOs). I should also note that I will be purchasing a "full-size" Glock because I have large hands.

Now, I'm a bit overwhelmed. With all of these different calibers, ammo brands/types/grains, I'm lost. I have some basic knowledge on these things (I know a .45 round is larger than a 9mm, and what a hollowpoint is) but not a whole lot more than that. This is where I would greatly appreciate the guidance of people more experienced in the realm of firearms.

Due to the intended use of the Glock (home defense and target shooting for practice) there are several things I've read that I should keep in mind. The first and seemingly most important is penetration capability. Obviously I don't want a round to penetrate a wall (I do live in an apartment building) and hurt a neighbor in the event of a home invasion. I don't know which rounds are better or worse for this, but I would imagine a .45 or a .357 is more likely to over-penetrate than a 9mm. With penetration in mind, which Glocks should I immediately rule out?

The next most important thing to me would be stability. In the event of a home invasion, whether it's over quick or I find myself in a barricaded position for several minutes, I need to be able to control my weapon. When I say this I'm mostly referring to the recoil. I'm not looking to unload a magazine in two seconds, just something that I could two round burst with reasonable accuracy if needed. I could handle a moderate amount of recoil (again, no need to empty a mag in two seconds) and space my shots a little more if it would ultimately be better for me. With recoil in a home defense situation in mind, which Glocks should I immediately rule out?

Next, magazine capacity. The lowest capacity I saw was seven I believe, and that was on a .45 model Glock. I think seven rounds per mag with two or three additionals already loaded would be be way more than enough for home defense. This isn't as important of a question, as such, but still an opinion I would like. Do you find stock magazine capacities to be sufficient or would you elect for an extended magazine?

Finally, lets talk cost. There is no point in buying a weapon that you can't afford ammo for (Chris Rock and bullet control, anyone?). I have NO idea how much ammo costs, but I can imagine that certain calibers are more expensive than others. I don't mind spending money on ammo, but I would prefer not to pay $5 per round. I intend to practice with the ammunition that will be loaded at home. As such, I need to be able to afford the ammunition so I can afford to hone my skills. With ammo cost in regards to caliber in mind, are there any Glocks I should immediately rule out?

To anyone who can offer me some guidance with the above questions, I am very grateful for your assistance. I know this is a long post and a question probably asked a bazillion times. If I can narrow down my options even a little bit that would be significant progress for me. I've asked several people at gun stores, former and active duty Military, and even a few police officers the same questions. I've gotten answers ALL across the board. Some tell me that anything other than a .357 would be a poor decision. Others swear on the 9mm. A few say the 10mm is king, and so on.

The following is the full list of Glocks I am considering:

G17 (9mm)
G22 (.40)
G20 (10mm Auto)
G21 (.45 Auto)
G37 (.45 GAP)
G31 (.357) Ruled out due to overpenetration

As I get some help (if I get any :cool:) I'll start narrowing that list to help me keep up with it. Thanks a ton everyone!

-engel556
 

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For a first pistol, I would strongly recommend a 9mm. The ballistics with modern ammo between calibers is becoming a less important consideration. The most important thing is practice, and considering the cost difference between 9mm and .45 ACP, you will practice more with 9mm. In respect to over-penetration, it's all about the bullet. Certainly hollow point for home defense, perhaps even "frangible" depending on your living quarters.

In addition to your list, I would add the G19, which is an extremely popular Glock. It's a terrific balance between control, conceal and capacity. Before you buy, try to find a range that rents the pistols you are interested in. One can look at stuff online for hours, and come to a completely different conclusion in a minute of holding the actual guns.

Finally, I would suggest you consider a .38 special revolver. Based on your lack of experience, if you want immediate viable home protection, revolvers have a much shorter learning curve and the .38 special round has served millions for over 100 years. That said, learning to use a semi auto pistol is not difficult, but in stressful situations, simpler is better. But, much of the fun is the learning....

Good luck and enjoy the process.
 

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Go with the G22 for your purposes. When you get shooting the recoil of all the models you listed will be controllable, these aren't huge bore revolvers.. Apartment? I'd rule out 357 being it was primarily invented because LEO needed better barrier penetration but in your case If you miss that means you run the chance of hitting your neighbors.

Avg prices of target ammo ($ for 50 rounds)
9mm-$12
40- $16
45- $18
10mm- $18ish

A good round that sits in the middle of price, capacity and stopping power is the .40 cal.

G22 sounds the best for you, no need for extended mags.

But! You will start shooting and love it, it happens. Being you have not shot yet you believe calibers larger than 9mm become increasingly harder to control and it's not the case. A decent grip and none of these calibers will go flying out of your hand, just won't. Again, these aren't hand cannons.

Back to you loving to shoot when you start, you may want to get a concealed carry permit and carry lawfully. Your choice in a large full size weapon will not be easy to conceal.
Now,
I have a G23. Like the 22 in almost every way but has a shorter slide, shorter grip(still room for pinky) and holds slightly fewer rounds. I conceal it fine.

All things to consider. When you conduct more research in the coming months people will fill your head with a lot of funny gun sayings and witty quotes but don't take them too seriously. A .45 won't pick your enemy up and throw them across the room, and a 9mm isn't shit. Take it all with a grain of salt.

You will be able to control a subcompact model glock just fine with enough practice so any of the small (baby glocks) are good choices as well and the best for concealed carry. They still hold 9 and 10 rounds in 40 & 9. Plenty of rounds. A pearce magazine extension even gets you a place for your pinky (not a big deal to most, you'll see when you start shooting) but some complain of big hands and no where to put their pinky.

Hope you are happy with your weapon when you buy it. Find someone who has fired weapons for years and you trust and have them show you the ropes and more importantly safety. The glock has no external safeties. There is nothing stopping your trigger if you pull it accidentally, and it will go bang if there's on in the chamber( a good thing, it's your job to see to it there is no "accidentally")

Hope I have been of some help, an welcome to the forum. Find yourself a decent hollow point defense round (I suggest Speer Gold Dot andFederal HST) and you will be set.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Awesome info so far! Thanks guys!

What you've taught me so far is that the ammo used is very important and that a 9mm or .40 are both good starters. And wow, I thought ammo was a lot more expensive than that. I know it would add up if you spend a lot of time at the range, but I thought it was gonna be a dollar per round or something like that. Sometimes I enjoy being wrong...

Ed, I totally understand starting small. I don't like the idea of a revolver though. It may be easy to use, but I don't want to fumble with loose ammo or a speedloader to reload. Though an encounter in the home probably wouldn't require more than 5-6 rounds, I'd rather play it safe than sorry. I'll definitely look at hollow points, and I'll definitely be taking a starter course that covers safety and operation. I'll also be sure to go try some out at a range first (I didn't know you could rent at a range).

Tender, damn ammo is a lot cheaper than I thought it would be. I'm sure it adds up quick, but I thought it would be about a dollar per bullet. I should have mentioned in the post that I don't plan on carrying the weapon except in my home. In North Carolina, it is near impossible to get a concealed carry permit unless you work for the government. It's also good to know that whatever I wind up with won't go flying out of my hands. I imagined the .357 being some aircraft carrier sinking body exploding cannon of death, but I guess it's different from a revolver of the same caliber. Needless to say I've ruled it out due to over-penetration.

Thank you both! I'm all ears to anyone else who'd like to give their two cents!
 

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In North Carolina, it is near impossible to get a concealed carry permit unless you work for the government.
Not so, it is a shall issue state! Few steps but well worth it! Don't rule it out so quickly..
 

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Not so, it is a shall issue state! Few steps but well worth it! Don't rule it out so quickly..
+1. I live in Raleigh. You have to take the 8 hour course including a shoot test. That will cost anywhere for $75 to $125 depending on where you go. Once you have passed the course you have to go to your local sheriff's office and get fingerprinted and apply. Once you do that and pay the associated fees ($100 or so depending on your county). The sheriff has 45 days to approve or decline the application. Unless you have a criminal record,a history of mental issues, or a domestic dispute resulting in a restraining order you will most likely be approved.
 

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Welcome to the Glock.pro forums, engel556...

When I look at the four questions you highlighted in red, the Glock 17 looks to be the perfect home defense Glock for you...

Penetration... Use 9mm hollowpoints...

Recoil... 9mm Glock 17 would have the least recoil of the Glocks you have selected.

Round count... Glock 17 holds the most rounds of those in your selection group.

Ammo cost... 9mm is the cheapest...

Glock's 17 is one of my two favorite Glocks... and I also use it for home defense... It's a great gun, especially for someone with large hands... The 19 is a good Glock also, but why would you want a Glock with a smaller grip and less round count for a home defense pistol?
 

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I lived in NC up until last year. They are a very gun friendly state, but VA is even more so.

Anyway, I don't know if they told you but a .45 will pick up and send someone across the room. ;)




Okay, all jokes aside I will echo what has been said already. Get to a range that has the models you're interested in a give it a go. As far as penetration goes, they will all penetrate. It's just best to be aware of everything when the time comes. Keep a flashlight handy, and be sure to never shoot in a direction that would harm anyone but the perp.

My last Glock purchase was supposed to be for a 23, but I ended up leaving the store with a 30 and it is my EDC. I love it. I have ginormous hands as well and I can vouch for a g19 and g23 being plenty big to hold onto. Got a 19 as my first glock. It's a very well rounded piece.

Don't over think which one you will buy. Just consider what you will be using it for and purchase the one that suites you best. Take your time and don't rush. After all, it's just a tool.

Good luck and happy shopping. It's always fun to be prospecting another Glock!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
+1. I live in Raleigh. You have to take the 8 hour course including a shoot test. That will cost anywhere for $75 to $125 depending on where you go. Once you have passed the course you have to go to your local sheriff's office and get fingerprinted and apply. Once you do that and pay the associated fees ($100 or so depending on your county). The sheriff has 45 days to approve or decline the application. Unless you have a criminal record,a history of mental issues, or a domestic dispute resulting in a restraining order you will most likely be approved.
Wow I didn't know that. I searched for NC gun laws and found this huge document that had just about everything I was looking for, but it made it sound like you had to be President in order to carry concealed. And even then they would have to think about it!

Would you happen to know where I would go to start the concealed permit process? I don't intend to do it for quite some time (need a Glock to conceal first!). Also need to practice up and take safety courses (starting with the safety). Seeing as how I don't intend to carry outside of the apartment at this point, it's not a big issue because damnit it's my apartment and I'll carry in it if I want to!

All else aside, I'm going to go with the 17. I keep hearing over and over on this website and also reading on others that it's a great starter. As cool as it would be to walk around with a .45 people-picker-upper or something different, starting small has always served me well in the past. And by small I mean basic, not lacking power!

With that said, are there any crucial accessories you would recommend? I've heard a set of night sights is a great addition to a Glock for both day and night shooting. I'm not looking to have a pimped out 17 with a 92x scope grenade launcher and chainsaw attached to it, just wondering if there are any very highly recommended accessories. I know, you all recommend the chainsaw, just get it out of your system.

Lastly, with a 17, is there any particular ammo model you recommend? I've been told to get hollowpoints several times now for damage and penetration reasons, but I did a quick search and got an overwhelming large number of hollowpoint 9mm ammo. Some are jacketed, some have different "grains" (which I now know is weight), some are designed for different ballistics, and some are even pretty colors. I don't care about all the fancy stuff, I just want some ammo I know will reliably feed with good accuracy, stopping power, and won't overpenetrate.

Thanks for all the help so far, other than the above questions I think you've all just about covered it for me!

edit: I also noticed the sticky in this forum regarding the recoil spring assembly on the Gen4's. Are all Gen4's still shipping with the defective RSAs? I figure they'd replace the defects and starting shipping them with the new RSAs, but if I'm going to need to replace something immediately after purchase I wanna make sure I know beforehand!
 

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Lots of police use federal hydro shock and they seem to be one of the best defensive ammo options out there. You'll pay for them though. As far as practicing, a box of regular ol 9mm FMJ of your choice should be fine. Some folks will say to steer clear of steel cased ammo, but I've never had a problem with it as it performs and cleans up just like all the rest. The new stuff at least.

As far as any must haves for your 17, I will suggest after you getting it to go to the range and shoot at least 500 rounds though it and figure what you'd like to have different and go from there. Odds are someone has an app for that. :)

A must have for me is an extended slide release lever and maritime spring cups. A front night sight and depending on the frame, some magazine extensions.

HTH
 

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Engel,
If you have already hooked up with someone that puts on safety training courses I am sure they also offer Concealed Handgun Permit courses. If you haven't found one yet, check around at your local gun stores and inquire about the classes. It wont be too hard to find one offering the class. In Wake County, the county even offers one at their public range. I know guys that are NRA instructors that offer courses in their home and then take you to a local range for the shooting portion. Make a few calls and you will be surprised how readily available this course is to get into.

The 17 is a great gun, but you may find the 19 to be easier to conceal. Its just my opinion, but I carry a subcompact because the full size guns, like my 21 are just to big to carry comfortably.

For accessories, all I do is a good set of night sites, and a quality holster. I use a IWB holster for concealed carry, and a OWB for range shooting or just carrying around my compound. Some folks carry a weapon mounted light, which I would as well, but have yet to invest in a accommodating holster and WML for my G30. I carry a flashlight clipped to my weak hand side front pocket.

Any reputable hollowpoint will get the job done. There are threads that have infinite pages discussing which ammo is best. The word "best" will always culminate in an endless debate of personal opinions. I use Speer Gold Dots, but there are many great options. Federal HST, Winchester Ranger, Hornady Critical Defense, and the list goes on. Grain weight is also debatable. The heavier the bullet will typically result in better penetration. I prefer heavy for caliber bullets, ie 9mm 147 gr, or 230 gr for .45acp. At the end of the day I don't put a lot of heavy thought into what brand or weight I shoot. I wouldn't want to get hit by any of them and with shot placement, training, and skill even Winchester White Box FMJ will do the job.

The key with SD ammo is to shoot it in your gun and know how your weapon reacts and functions, and to practice with a range ammo with similar or the same gr weights. A lighter weight projectile will hit the target at a slightly different point of impact than a heavier one. So if you shoot 115 gr FMJ while practicing and then you switch to a 124gr or 147 gr for your primary SD load the point of impact will be different. If you never practice with your SD rounds you will never know where to hold to get the POI you are intending for.
 

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To answer your questions you ask in your original post, the best option for you would be a 20 or 12 gauge Shotgun. Using birdshot, over penetrating a wall into your neighbors room will be drastically reduced. The firearm, when handled properly is very easy to manage recoil with and when setup properly, can have a high capacity in, and on the gun. You can also pick one up cheaper than you can buy most handguns for. You can buy 100 rounds of birdshot for $20.00 at Wal-Mart.
 

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I say Glock 19. 9mm should be enough for your needs, it is just as accurate as a full size Glock, especially in a home defense situation, can use higher capacity mags, and later on when you do get you CCW permit you will be able to carry it without needing to purchase another weapon. That is if the G19 fits your hands. Otherwise go for the longer grip G17.
 
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