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So i just got my lee reloading kit, my bullseye powder, cci primers.etc.

Bought my first glock yesterday and hit the range...

the first round did not enter the chamber and jammed the gun, after dis-lodging the round. i then shot a few then i had one where a giant cloud of powder came out, all over my hands and face.

what went wrong? What do i need to do? adjust dies?
 

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Without looking at it I have trouble saying for a fact. But let me ask a couple of questions and I maybe able to get to the bottom of what is happening here. First, do you have a micrometer? If so, what is your OAL of the round? What is the diameter of your crimp? Last the round that had powder come out all over you, did the side of the casing rupture?

Also, two pieces of advise for anybody especially someone new to re-loading. Do you have a lymann guide? If not get one and follow it using a micrometer to set up your dies. Don't eyeball anything. I have a friend that does that. Says it close enough. I know of two kabooms he has had and still don't want to listen. "His way is faster". I am waiting for his gun to fall apart and pull back a bloody hand then he may listen
 

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+ 1 for the above. Reloading your own ammo is a critical process. Ther are so many things you have watch for, ie: that each case is charged, that you don't double charge a case. Always make sure you start at the low end of the powder charge range for your given bullet weight and design. Also, as sfguard said, over all cartridge length is important, too long and it tends to jam up semi-autos, too short and it can cause an over pressure situation. You must be very careful because the process of reloading is delicate. A simple mistake can cause damage to you pistol as well as serious injury to you. Crimp plays another part in accuracy. Generally an average of .005 of an inch of crimp of the case mouth into the bullet will do fine. That equates to roughly .5-1 turns down after the inside crimp portion of the bullet seat/crimp die contacts the case mouth. For you powder charge, make sure to measure random charges often, every 5-10 round to make sure its keeping accurate. Also, visually inspect each casing for cracks or dents. I know its a jumble of stuff, but I hope this helps. Boomer.
 

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Like Boomer was hitting on there is alot to watch out for. If someone is new to re-loading I suggest finding someone that has done it for awhile and get with them. If that isn't available then you have to just find as much info as possible and do your best. But always remember it is dangerous don't be re-loading and trying to do two or three other things at the same time.
 

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All they guys above have GREAT information.. I would stick to their suggestions.

I just wanted to add. If I was you I would fire a few hundred store bought rounds before I started reloading a brand new gun. So you know how the gun is supposed to act. Glocks are great guns and they don't mind reloads as long as they are done correctly. It only takes one bad round for "kaboom", I would hate for any gun to go explode in my hand, especially a new 1.
 
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